King.Menon.2010 - Citation: 89 Foreign Aff. 20 2010 Content

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+ 2 (,1 1/,1( Citation: 89 Foreign Aff. 20 2010 Content downloaded/printed from HeinOnline (http://heinonline.org) Fri Jul 1 14:37:39 2011 -- Your use of this HeinOnline PDF indicates your acceptance of HeinOnline's Terms and Conditions of the license agreement available at http://heinonline.org/HOL/License -- The search text of this PDF is generated from uncorrected OCR text. -- To obtain permission to use this article beyond the scope of your HeinOnline license, please use: https://www.copyright.com/ccc/basicSearch.do? &operation=go&searchType=0 &lastSearch=simple&all=on&titleOrStdNo=0015-7120
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Prisoners of the Caucasus Russia's Invisible Civil War Charles King and Rajan Menon THE EMPTY gymnasium of School No. i in Beslan is whipped by winds from the plains of North Ossetia, a republic in Russia's North Caucasus region. On September 1, 2004, the first day of classes, masked gunmen entered the elementary school and herded hundreds of children and their teachers onto the indoor basketball court. They held their captives for three days. In the stifling late-summer heat, some children died from dehydration. Many others were killed when a series of homemade bombs exploded, collapsing the roof and igniting a mas- sive fire. Today, photographs of the more than 300 victims, including those of smiling girls outfitted in the ornate hair ribbons traditional on the first day of classes, line the walls of a makeshift memorial. The Beslan siege was Russia's most heart-rending episode of carnage during the last two decades. But it was by no means unique. Two years earlier, gunmen interrupted a play at a Moscow theater and took the entire audience hostage; 170 people died when security forces attempted a rescue. A series of suicide bombings in and around Moscow killed CHARLEs KING is Professor of International Affairs and Government at Georgetown University. His latest book is Extreme Politics: Nationalism, Violence, and the End ofEastern Europe. RAJAN MENON is Monroe J. Rathbone Professor of International Relations at Lehigh University and Anne and Bernard Spitzer Professor of Political Science at the City College of New York/City University of New York. His latest book is The End of Alliances. For an annotated guide to this topic, see "What to Read on Russian Politics" at www.foreignaffairs.com/readinglists/russia. [20] HeinOnline -- 89 Foreign Aff. 20 2010
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Prisoners of the Caucasus dozens in 2003 and 2004. In the days before Beslan, suicide terrorists brought down two Russian passenger airplanes. In November 2009, a bomb derailed the Nevsky Express, the high-speed train connecting Moscow and St. Petersburg, killing nearly 30 passengers. (Another bomb had derailed the same train in August 2007, although no one was killed.) And then, this past March, a pair of female suicide bombers blew themselves up in the Moscow metro during morning rush hour, killing nearly 40 people.
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King.Menon.2010 - Citation: 89 Foreign Aff. 20 2010 Content

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