Chapter_24_Solutions_Manual[1] - Chapter 24 Completing the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Chapter 24 Completing the Audit Review Questions 24-1 There are four presentation and disclosure-related audit objectives: 24-2 A financial statement disclosure checklist is an audit tool that summarizes all disclosure requirements contained in generally accepted accounting principles. Auditors use the disclosure checklist to determine that all required disclosures are completely presented and disclosed in the financial statements and accompanying footnotes. This helps the auditor obtain sufficient appropriate evidence about the completeness objective for the presentation and disclosure- related audit objective. 24-3 A contingent liability is a potential future obligation to an outside party for an unknown amount resulting from activities that have already taken place. Some examples would be: Pending litigation Income tax disputes Product warranties Notes receivable discounted Guarantees of obligations of others Unused balances of outstanding letters of credit 24-1 Presentation and Disclosure-Related Audit Objectives Description Occurrence and rights and obligations Account-related information as described in the footnotes exists and represents the rights and obligations of the company. Completeness All required disclosures are included in the financial statement footnotes. Accuracy and valuation Footnote disclosures are accurate and valued correctly. Classification and understandability Account balances are appropriately classified and related financial statement disclosures are understandable. 24-3 (continued) An actual liability is a real future obligation to an outside party for a known amount from activities that have already taken place. Some examples would be: Notes payable Accounts payable Accrued interest payable Income taxes payable Payroll withholding liabilities Accrued salaries and wages 24-4 If you are concerned about the possibility of contingent liabilities for income tax disputes, there are various procedures you could use for an intensive investigation in that area. One good approach would be an analysis of income tax expense. Unusual or nonrecurring amounts should be investigated further to determine if they represent situations of potential tax liability. Another helpful procedure for uncovering potential tax liabilities is to review the general correspondence file for communication with attorneys or internal revenue agents. This might give an indication that the potential for a liability exists even though no actual litigation has begun. Finally, an examination of internal revenue agent reports from prior years may provide the most obvious indication of disputed tax matters. 24-5 The auditor would be interested in a client's future commitments to purchase raw materials at a fixed price so that this information could be disclosed in the financial statements. The commitment may be of interest to an investor as it is compared to the future price movements of the material. A future investor as it is compared to the future price movements of the material....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/27/2011 for the course AC555 AC555 taught by Professor Tarbet during the Spring '10 term at Keller Graduate School of Management.

Page1 / 24

Chapter_24_Solutions_Manual[1] - Chapter 24 Completing the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online