Global Studies 1 Reading Notes Midterm

Global Studies 1 Reading Notes Midterm - Mimi Huggins...

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Mimi Huggins Global Studies 1 T.A.: Haley Wrinkle October 27, 2009 Global Studies 1: Reading Notes Week 1: Marshall G. S. Hodgson’s “In the Center of the Map” Lecture #2 In his article, Marshal Hodgson emphasizes the tendency for every country to think of themselves as the “best” and “most powerful”. In the 16 th century Matteo Ricci brought a map of the world designed by the Europeans to China. Matteo’s map included the new discovery of America. The Chinese disliked how they were located on the right-hand edge of the map; they believed themselves to be the “Middle Kingdom” and thought they should be located in the middle. Hodgson’s article shows how we are taught history in a certain perspective. He claims that maps are ways to express our feelings and a desire to put oneself at the center. Professor Gunn also discussed this idea of a “biased history” in his first lecture. In lecture Gunn talked about how different nations and states have biased views of their history and culture. We tend to learn history in a certain perspective. This relates to the overall themes of this Global Studies course because we are reviewing history from a global standpoint.
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David Held, et al., “Introduction” (to Global Transformations) Lecture #3 Held defines globalization as the widening, deepening and speeding up of worldwide interconnectedness in all aspects of contemporary social life. He argues about the “globalization debate”; which is the controversy of whether or not globalization is happening. There are three different perspectives of the “globalization debate”: hyperglobalists, skeptics, and transformationalists. Held believes that the world is not becoming one place rather it is a “set of processes and networks variously expressed, often conflicting, globally entwined.” Gunn discussed the globalization debate and the three perspectives in lecture. This article is relevant to our global studies course as a whole. It gives students who have never taken a global studies course a basic description of what globalization is about. Held touches on the concept that technological and economical development in one area of the world can significantly change the lives of individuals around the globe; I think this view is a basic principle in the discussion of globalization and will be very useful for the rest of the course. Held’s article reminds me of Wolf’s introduction. Wolf argues that the interconnectedness of our globe causes ideas, people, technology, diseases, etc to travel at great speeds. This is relative to Held’s article about interconnectedness and the effects of globalization around the world. Week 2: J.M. Roberts, “The Mongols” Lecture #4 Roberts writes about a nation of people during the 12 th and 13 th centuries that were completely dominant of Eastern Europe and Asia. They sought to conquer the world with the help of their leader Chingis Khan. The Mongols learned techniques from the regions
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that they conquered. They developed advanced technology, making them more powerful
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course GLOBAL 1 taught by Professor Gunn during the Fall '08 term at UCSB.

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Global Studies 1 Reading Notes Midterm - Mimi Huggins...

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