10-NAmerica-2(GEOG142)

10-NAmerica-2(GEOG142) - North America II(CHAPTER 3 134-183...

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North America II (CHAPTER 3: 134-183)
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INDUSTRIAL LOCATION FACTORS Location of raw materials Labor availability Energy availability Location of market Transportation Relative importance of factors change: INDIVIDUAL SECTORS NATURE OF THE ECONOMY
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FUEL RESOURCES
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Primary Secondary Tertiary Quaternary Quaternary Combined SECTORS OF THE ECONOMY Canada 4% 22% 74% United States 65% 2% 15% 18%
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Post Industrial Revolution High Tech focus not manufacturing Location-N California’s Silicon Valley 1. World class research 2. Technological know-how from a highly educated workforce 3. Close proximity to a cosmopolitan urban center- example : San Francisco 4. Abundant venture capital 5. Entrepreneurial culture that supports risk taking and forgives failure 6. Locally based network of global business linkages 7. High amenity environment in the form of quality housing, pleasant weather, scenic countryside, and year round recreation
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300 days of sunshine per year Recreational water within 1 hour drive Affordable housing Start up capital ($1 billion) Low risk environment Tax breaks Lenders Businesses POSTINDUSTRIAL LOCATION FACTORS
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POSTINDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS Major University (Graduate Engineering Program) Economic enterprises Government Social-services complexes Military ATTRACTIONS FOR HIGH-TECH COMPANIES
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Nova Scotia Saskatchewan Yukon Alberta BC Manitoba Newfoundland Ontario PEI New Brunswick Northwest Territories Nunavut Canada Quebec
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Canada-Nunavut Newest Territory- 1999 Nunavut Derived from Inuit and federal government land claim agreement Substantial degree of native self government 20% of Canada’s geography-Largest political area
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Pre 20 th Century History Continental Canadian unification occurred in the latter part of the 1800’s Until 1850 Canada’s frontier was Lake Huron Canada unified as a nation due to fears it USA would expand north 1886 the trans-Canadian Pacific railway completed to Vancouver-Settlement throughout the west (prairie’s and B.C.)began to occur
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French not the Brits were the first colonizers New France stretched from the St. Lawrence to the
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course GEOG 142 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '11 term at Mott Community College.

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10-NAmerica-2(GEOG142) - North America II(CHAPTER 3 134-183...

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