16-SSAfrica-2(GEOG142)

16-SSAfrica-2(GEOG142) - SUBSAHARANAFRICAII(CHAPTER6:264317...

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SUBSAHARAN AFRICA II (CHAPTER 6: 264-317)
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REGIONS OF SUBSAHARAN  AFRICA
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WEST AFRICA REGION Most populous region-numerous cultural groups Steppe Deserts-Southern Sahara-SAHEL zone Climate & vegetation share similarities in east/west patterns Numerous modest size coastal countries stretching inland to the north Historically coastal traders Minimal intra-regional interaction/trade Products go to international not regional markets
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WEST AFRICA
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NIGERIA Capital Abuja 130.6 million people Independence from Britain1960 250 peoples/cultures Hausu-Fulani northern region most populous Large oil fields discovered in Niger River Delta 1950’s
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At independence, Nigeria was composed of  three regions (based on regional tribal  bases of the Hausa-Fulani, Yoruba, and  Ibo). Yoruba Ibo Hausa-Fulani Muslim dominated Colonial development Densely populated rural areas NIGERIA
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NIGERIA  
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In 1967 interregional rivalries led to civil war  when the eastern region tried to succeed as  Biafra. Regions were subdivided and rearranged to  ensure a civil war did not occur again. Currently - a  Federal State  under a military  government Capital city moved from  Lagos  to  Abuja Imposition of Muslim Sharia Law in north  states caused new problems NIGERIA
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NIGERIA 
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NIGERIA-LAGOS Historically Yorba fishing village Portuguese Slave Center British colonial headquarters 15.2 million people Low lying islands Calcutta of Africa-high rises mixed with poverty, disorganized, polluted & corrupt
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Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger & Chad have large areas but relatively small populations Most countries have authoritarian military governments Concentration of wealth in small minorities Coast – interior rivalries Small size countries relatively easy to dominate
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Ghana-first independent country in 1957 Large dam project creating lake Volta Democracy followed a military regime Liberia Founded in 1822 by freed American slaves Military coup in 1980 was followed by civil war in 1989
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Senegal French colonial capital of Dakar Democratic tradition of more than 40 years By no means rich but relatively successful 90% Muslim France is its leading trade partner & supporter
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Astride the equator Mainly lowland  country Vast areas of  rainforest  Environment is a  mixed blessing? EQUATORIAL AFRICA
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course GEOG 142 taught by Professor Unknown during the Spring '11 term at Mott Community College.

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16-SSAfrica-2(GEOG142) - SUBSAHARANAFRICAII(CHAPTER6:264317...

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