Lecture01-Ancient-Ports

Lecture01-Ancient-Ports - TTE- 6755 Port Planning and...

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Unformatted text preview: TTE- 6755 Port Planning and Development Lecture #01 Ancient Ports- Pharos (the ancient port of Egypt on the Mediterranean) hodes (the ancient Minoan port of Crete)- Rhodes (the ancient Minoan port of Crete)- Piraeus (the ancient port of Athens)- Ostia Antica (the oldest port of Rome)- Portus Augusti et Portus Uterque (the newer ports of ancient Rome)- Portus Cosanus (the ancient port of Naples)- Caesarea Maritima (the ancient port of Judea-Palestina)- Byblos (the ancient port of the Phoenicians in Lebanon)- Karnak (ancient port of Egypt on the Nile) L. Prieto-Portar, 2009 The maritime movement of people and goods has always been the cheapest and most convenient form of transportation, and for that reason the world has built ports since at least 6,000 BC. Ports evolved alongside the technology of the ships that they served. Initially, ports were simple wooden posts that served to tie rafts, dugout logs or curved wooden branches covered with the hides of animals, or like the North American Indians, used birch bark instead of hides. As the river traffic increased, simple piers were built to accommodate deeper ships that carried larger and heavier loads. The Egyptians. The Egyptians developed ports on the eastern Mediterranean around 6,000 BC. One of their most famous ports was Pharos, which was considered one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Egyptians built large ships made of bundles of reeds for use on the Nile River due to their lack of large trees. The ends of the reeds were bound together and bent upward to form both the bow and the stern of the ship so that in profile the ship was crescent shaped. On the Rea Sea, trees were plentiful, and ships were built from large logs that were hollowed out. These resulted in flat- keeled boats with square corners at the ends. By 3,000 BC reed boats were reaching Crete and Lebanon. They were powered first by rowers, and later by simple sails. The Pharos lighthouse at the site that would later become Alexandria. This was considered as one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Minoans. The Minoans inhabited Crete, and developed the famous port of Cnossos . The Minoans also developed a new type of ship around 2,000 BC. Its design involved a keel made from a log with ribs and wood planking on the sides that joined at the bow and the stern. The bow was protected against the beating of the waves by bending the keel upward and forward. The stress on the bow was usually relieved by beams (called wales ) that supported the bow and ran backward along the sides of the ship. Modern ships have the same horizontal beams, now placed inside the hull and called longitudinals . Both the Egyptian and Minoan ships had narrow beams to facilitate rowing, and therefore, were not convenient to carry cargo. The Colossus lighthouse of the port of Rhodes was another of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World. The Phoenicians....
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course TTE 6755 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at FIU.

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Lecture01-Ancient-Ports - TTE- 6755 Port Planning and...

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