Lecture04-Types-of-Ports

Lecture04-Types-of-Ports - TTETTE 6755 Port Planning and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–18. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
TTE TTE- 6755 Port Planning and Development 6755 Port Planning and Development Lecture #04 Types of Ports L. Prieto-Portar 2009
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
A harbor is a protected area of water. A port is a harbor, plus terminal facilities such as piers, wharves, docks, cargo and passenger terminals buildings and an infrastructure of roads, railroads, airports, rivers and/or canals. The American Heritage Dictionary defines a port as “ a town having a harbor for ships taking on or discharging cargo ”. Ports are the link between maritime and land- based trade. In addition to ocean ports and river ports , here are some additional classifications for other ports: - Passenger (cruise) ports ; - Container ports ; - Dry Bulk Cargo (“dirty”) ports ; - Naval (military) ports ; - Mainline ports (links between rivers and oceans) ; - Seaports (direct access to the sea) ; - Treaty ports ; - Free ports ; - Artificial ports ; - Small ports and marinas .
Background image of page 2
Cruise Ship Ports - Port of Miami (US) - Port Everglades (US) - Port of Málaga (Spain) ort of Auckland (New Zealand) - Port of Auckland (New Zealand) - Ensenada (México)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Port of Miami (the cruise port on the left and the container port on the right rear).
Background image of page 4
The location of the Port of Miami with respect to the Miami downtown area.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The Port of Miami location in Biscayne Bay. One of the main problems of the port is access. There is only one ridge and all bridge and all trucks must contend with the downtown traffic which slows to a standstill everyday.
Background image of page 6
The Port of Miami. The Port of Miami-Dade is ranked first in the world for number of cruise ship passengers. The Port is ranked eighth among the nation's leading seaports. The Port of Miami is also the largest container port in Florida, and in the top ten in the U.S. with an area of 640 acres. The cargo statistics are,
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
Port Everglades. Port Everglades is located on the southeastern coast of the Florida peninsula within the three cities of Fort Lauderdale, Hollywood and Dania Beach, as well as unincorporated Broward County. Port Everglades' jurisdiction encompasses a total of 2,190 acres (887 ectares) which includes 1,742 acres of hectares) which includes 1,742 acres of upland and 448 acres of submerged land.
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Port Everglades, Florida.
Background image of page 10
Port Everglades Cargo Statistics. 3.63 3.43 16.96 16.01 2.54 2.40 0.16 0.19 0.09 0.10 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Mi ll io ns of To CONTAINER CARGO TOTAL PETROLEUM TOTAL BULK TOTAL BREAK BULK TOTAL RO/RO- FLO/FLO CARGO TYPES 2003 2002 TOTAL SHIP CALLS (2003) Container Ships 32% Cargo Ships 4% Petrol. Tanker/Barge 14% Cruise Ships 38% Navy/USCG 0% Other bunkers/tugs 12%
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The cruise ship docking area of the Port of Málaga, Spain.
Background image of page 12
The Port of Auckland, New Zealand.
Background image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The new cruise port in Ensenada, Mexico.
Background image of page 14
The Sydney harbor and the Opera House in the background.
Background image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Container Ports - Port of Long Beach (US ) - The Port of Kobe (Japan) ort of Miami (US) - Port of Miami (US) - Port Everglades (US) - Port of Apra (US-Guam) - Port of Gibraltar (Spain) - Port of Melbourne (Australia)
Background image of page 16
Planning Container Ports. 1) Knowledge of the size and types of containers, to determine the equipment needed
Background image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 18
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course TTE 6755 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at FIU.

Page1 / 76

Lecture04-Types-of-Ports - TTETTE 6755 Port Planning and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 18. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online