Lecture09-Super-Port

Lecture09-Super-Port - TTE TTE-6955 Port Planning and...

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Unformatted text preview: TTE TTE-6955 Port Planning and Development 6955 Port Planning and Development Lecture #09 Lecture #09 Miami-Dade and Browards AIR and SEA PORT Project Luis A. Prieto-Portar 2009 The location of the Super-Port is proposed close to the two Countys common boundary, as an island one mile out to sea, 3 miles long by 1 mile wide. Its foundation is on marine limestones. The Purpose of a Super Port. A new port is suggested to replace all four of Miamis and Browards ports, both air and sea. Browards Port Everglades has reached its size limitation due to ecological constraints. Port of Miami can not expand South, the only direction left, due to the location of the Biscayne National Park. In addition, the ports south docks, which cargo and container traffic, is limited in its depth to 42 feet due to the National Park. A common Super Port would reduce environmental pressures (noise, fuel spills, transportation congestion, etc) and increase security (controlled access, etc). The Kansai Artificial Island Airport. In the 1960s, when the Kobe-Osaka region was rapidly losing trade to the Tokyo area, their planners proposed a new airport near Kobe and Osaka, but 5 km out to sea. The construction of Kansai was started in 1987, by building a sea wall of rocks and 48,000 tetrahedral concrete blocks. The sea wall was finished in 1989. Then the fill began, and amounted to 21 million cubic meters. This Phase-One required 10,000 workers to invest 10 million work hours of labor over 3 years. The effort required 80 ships to lay the 30 m layer of fill over the sea floor inside the sea wall. In 1990, a three-kilometer bridge was completed connecting the Kansai island to the mainland at Rinku-Town, at a cost of $1 billion. In 1994 the Kansai island airport opened. However, their engineers expected the island to settle 12 m in 50 years. Instead, by 2000, the settlement had been 11.5 m. The passenger terminal requires periodic jacking of all its 900 concrete columns to remain level. The rest of the 510 ha island has had problems with fuel tanks, roads, utilities, etc. By 2008, the island had sunk 8 meters more, for a total of 20 m. After 20 years of planning, 3 years of construction and several billion dollars of investment, the project has become the most expensive civil works project in modern history. An additional expansion is now underway for another runway (see rigs in the foreground). The new 545 ha island is being built in deeper water (19.5 m instead of the 18 m for the first island). The soft alluvial clay layer is 26 m thick, so it is expected to settle even more than the first island, probably in excess of the 18 m predicted. Using Phase One settlement of 20 m in shallower water, Phase Two should be closer to 25 to 30 m of settlement! Kansai Airport Kansai airports Phase One, seen in the background, is 2.4 miles long and 0.6 miles wide, built on the dredged clay from the bay bottom.wide, built on the dredged clay from the bay bottom....
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Lecture09-Super-Port - TTE TTE-6955 Port Planning and...

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