Lecture13-Navigational-Aids

Lecture13-Navigational-Aids - TTETTE-6755 Port Planning and...

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TTE TTE-6755 Port Planning and Design 6755 Port Planning and Design Lecture Lecture #13 #13 Harbor Navigational Aids - Coast Guard ships: ) buoy tenders, a) buoy tenders, b) construction tenders, c) ice breakers, etc; - Harbor pilots; - Buoys; - Lights (modern versions of lighthouses); - VTS (Vessel Traffic Services); - Navigation Equipment; and, - Simulation. L. Prieto-Portar 2009
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Lighthouses are symbols of older navigational aids on dangerous coasts.
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Navigational Aids. What are navigational aids? Navigation aids are special structures that enhance the safety of approaching vessels to the land mass by marking the locations of safety and danger. In addition, some of these aids also determine the location or speed of the vessels. They are maintained by the United States Coast Guard and by local port authorities. Among these aids are, - Coast Guard ships: a) buoy tenders, b) construction tenders, c) ice breakers, etc; - Harbor pilots; - Buoys; - Lights (modern versions of lighthouses); - VTS (Vessel Traffic Services); - Navigation Equipment; and, - Simulation.
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The USCG Cutter HUDSON, a 21-foot aluminum “TANB” buoy tender.
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USCGC Primrose WLIC 316 was built in 1944. She is a 100 foot inland construction tender fitted with a pile driver on the bow to build aids to navigation.
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USCGC Chokeberry WLI 65304 is a 65 foot inland buoy tender that currently operates out of Chrisfield, Maryland. It builds and maintains smaller aids to navigation in inland areas. The Chokeberry was built in 1946.
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USCGC Polar Sea WAGB 11 is the largest ice breaker of the Coast Guard fleet. It has a length of 399 foot and as all icebreakers, it is painted red to add contrast to the ice and snow found in the polar regions. The Polar Sea was built in 1976.
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Harbor Pilots. These ships employ the use of visual navigational aids, shoreline mapping, nautical charts, experience in tides, currents and weather to safely and efficiently bring the ship into the port. Note the twin-hull design for greater stability.
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Pilots. Pilots provide the local knowledge that ship captains lack, including currents, tidal ranges, shallows, and a host of other characteristics. It takes years of study, training, and experience to become a State of Florida licensed pilot. Unlike most other states, only candidates with the highest scores are considered. The candidate also needs to have actively served in a leadership position in a merchant ship as a captain or officer. Each has to go through a training period as a deputy pilot in the port where the pilot will be licensed. This is done so the pilot can become familiar with the individual local conditions. These conditions can vary greatly from port to port and they include, but are not limited to the weather, river transit, local authorities and laws, and the topography of the channels and shorelines leading to the port.
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Piloting under Different Conditions. Pilots must be aware of the speed and direction of all other ships that might come within
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Lecture13-Navigational-Aids - TTETTE-6755 Port Planning and...

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