Lecture14-Harbor-entrances-channels

Lecture14-Harbor-entrances-channels - TTE TTE-6755 Port...

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Unformatted text preview: TTE TTE-6755 Port Planning and Design 6755 Port Planning and Design Lecture #14 Lecture #14 Harbor Channels, Entrances and Turning Basins he Influence of Ship Characteristics on Port Design.- The Influence of Ship Characteristics on Port Design.- The Access Navigational Channel.- The Harbor Entrance.- The Turning Basin. L. Prieto-Portar, 2009 The Influence of Ship Characteristics on Port Design. A ships length L s is the distance between the forward-most and the aft-most structures at the loaded waterline. It includes the bulbous bow, if the ship has one. A ships beam B is the maximum width of the ships hull. The ships depth of hull is the depth at mid-ship from the bottom of the keel to the top of the main deck. The ships draft D is the distance from the ships waterline to the lowest point of the bottom of her keel. The ships deadweight tonnage ( DWT ) is the carrying capacity of the ship, including the total weight of the cargo, stores, fresh water, fuel, etc. The tonnage is currently given in metric tons. It is the difference between light displacement and the displacement of the ship when she is loaded to the load line . This DWT varies with the salinity of the water, the latitude and the season. The ships gross tonnage ( G T ) is the entire internal cubic capacity of the ship, expressed in cubic meters ( m 3 ). The access of a ship to harbors and channels is dependent on its maneuverability . A ships open sea maneuverability may be very different from its behavior at low speeds inside a port. Therefore, the Permanent International Association of Navigation Congresses (PIANC) suggested in 1995 the following guide for the classification of the maneuverability of ships: 1) Long slender ships ( L s /B > 6.5) are more directionally stable than shorter ones, which however, are better able to navigate around tight bends. 2) In shallow water ( h/T & 1.5) all ships will turn less readily (where h is the water depth nd the height between the design tidal level to the water reference level). and T is the height between the design tidal level to the water reference level). 3) Low-speed maneuverability may be quite different from that at the service speed for which the ship was designed. 4) Single-screw/single-rudder ships will maneuver quite well, but will experience screw bias (an offset due to lateral movement of the stern induced by the propeller necessitating counter-rudder). 5) Ships with single controllable-pitch screws may experience screw bias, even when the propeller pitch is set for low or zero thrust. 6) Twin-screw/twin-rudder ship generally have good maneuverability and control at all speeds. 7) Twin-screw-twin-rudder ships may have good maneuverability at service speeds, but poor maneuverability at low speeds....
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course TTE 6755 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at FIU.

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Lecture14-Harbor-entrances-channels - TTE TTE-6755 Port...

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