Lecture18-Piers-and-Quays

Lecture18-Piers-and-Quays - TTETTE-6755 Port Planning and...

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TTE TTE-6755 Port Planning and Design 6755 Port Planning and Design Lecture Lecture #18 #18 Piers and Quays - 1. Port capacity factors . Design criteria - 2. Design criteria - 3. Types of wharf systems - 4. The construction of seawall - 5. Port utilities Luis Prieto-Portar 2009
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The wharf wall, or quay, at left is different than the finger pier at the right. What is the difference between these two? In essence, a pier provides a minimal wharf facility at a depth where vessels can dock. A quay provides many important facilities to unload and load cargo and passengers.
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Some finger piers do not serve vessels, such as this tourist and fishing pier shown above. The basic structure is the same as a cargo pier, but the magnitudes of the forces involved are at different scales.
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Port of Miami’s container quay.
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A view west of the Port of Miami.
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This new pre-fabricated concrete pier was developed by the US Navy to serve as a temporary port anywhere in the world.
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One of the most extraordinary ports ever built was the Mulberry Port. It was built in secrecy by British civil engineers during the beginning of 1944. It consisted in dozens of these pre-fabricated concrete caissons. During the invasion of France on the 6 th of June, 1944, they were towed across the English Channel and sunk on the shores of Normandy. They created a large port in a matter of hours!
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1. Port capacity factors. a) Cargo off-loading and loading methods. b) Port inter-modal connections. c) Cargo organization and distribution methods. 1a) Cargo off-loading and loading methods. A RTG (rubber tire gantry) at left versus a rail mounted gantry crane at right.
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Port capacity factors Rail-mounted gantry cranes.
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A gantry crane rail.
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The south quay of the Port of Miami has a dozen large gantry crane.
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Port capacity factors: Roll-on/Roll-off.
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1b. Port inter-modal connections. Security gates.
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course TTE 6755 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '09 term at FIU.

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Lecture18-Piers-and-Quays - TTETTE-6755 Port Planning and...

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