PCM-Lecture09-The-RE-Field-Office

PCM-Lecture09-The-RE-Field-Office - Project and...

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Unformatted text preview: Project and Construction Management Project and Construction Management Lecture #09 Lecture #09 The Resident Engineer’s Field Office Luis Prieto-Portar 2010 Setting up the Field Office. The field office requirements for the RPR or RE are established in the specifications section of the contract documents . The contractor is expected to provide these requirements within the price for the project. These include:- field office trailer with HVAC, ramps and access steps, etc;- office furnishings (desks, table for plans, conference table, etc);- utilities (power, telephone, water, temporary septic tank, etc);- janitorial and security services (cleaning and guards);- parking area (may be a remote facility plus shuttle). These field office trailers are usually rented on a month-to-month basis. Companies such as Williams-Scottsman, GE, etc, advertise in all construction journals offering their services. The RE Familiarization with the Contract Documents. The RE must gather a complete set of the contract documents, which will include at least, o Contract drawing sets (site work, civil, structural, architectural, MEP, etc); o Standard drawing sets; o Specifications; o Reference Specifications; o Standards; o Test data (borings, pile load tests, dewatering tests, etc). Time should be spent to carefully study all these documents. Make lists of the conflicting designs and unclear specifications. Ideally, this study should be performed at the designer’s office, so that the RE can ask questions directly from the design staff. Key provisions may be marked up (or highlighted) and cross-referenced so that interfaces between the trades can be watched carefully. Finally, a list of all milestones should be compiled in chronological order. Equipment for the Field Office. Field offices for medium to large projects will require the following: 1) Several desks and chairs; 2) Plan table and plan storing racks or “stick files”; 3) Filing cabinets; 4) Hard line telephone service for both telephone and high speed internet; 5) Bookcase; 6) Toilet and lavatory; 7) Electrical power, water and sanitary sewer storage bladder; HVAC: 8) Copier and FAX; PC computers and printers; ) adio pagers/telephones for jobsite network; 9) Radio pagers/telephones for jobsite network; 10) Small plotter when a CPM is used on a daily basis for project control. Typical office supplies that need to be at hand may include, 1) Report forms, field books or “record books” for daily diaries; 2) Stationery with letterheads, transmittal forms and envelopes; 3) Blank bond paper, columnar pads (for estimating), loose-leaf notebooks; 4) Pens, pencils, felt-tip pens, highlighter pens, and other supplies; 5) Rejection or non-conforming tags; 6) Digital cameras for job control and documentation of progress and problems; 7) Hard hats for visitors, reflective vests, safety harnesses, etc. Communication Systems....
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course CGN 4930 taught by Professor Prieto-portar during the Spring '11 term at FIU.

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PCM-Lecture09-The-RE-Field-Office - Project and...

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