DE-Lecture02-Historical-background

DE-Lecture02-Historical-background - Dredging Engineering...

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Unformatted text preview: Dredging Engineering Dredging Engineering Lecture #02 Lecture #02 Brief History of Dredging Brief History of Dredging Luis Prieto-Portar 2010 Introduction. The origins of dredging are lost in antiquity. The first known dredgers were the Phoenicians. Their harbors were excellently built over 5,000 years ago, and their ships were the first known merchant vessels in the World. The Phoenicians (modern day Lebanese) created a worldwide network of ports that may have included parts of America. Their ships were stable in rough waters, as demonstrated by the 13 th century BC model of a Phoenician merchant ship shown below. (Museum of Philadelphia Civic Center). The Port of Byblos was intensively used by the Phoenicians since 3,000 BC, who were great merchants and seamen. Byblos became a major port of the Mediterranean Sea. Ships came to load materials the Phoenicians brought from inland, such as Lebanese cedar, oil, gold, papyri and alabaster. In the 12 th Century, the Crusaders built thick outer walls for the seaport, still seen today. The first method of dredging was simply having workers wade into the water and hand scoop the mud from the bottom of the river beds. They used spades and wicker baskets. This method was presumed to have been used by Phoenicians (in Byblos), Egyptians (Nile) and Sumerians (Euphrates and Tigris) about 4,000 BC. Both the Egyptians and the Sumerians built canals by hand dredging to supplement or improve their river systems. The Babylonian canals were dredged by Emperor Nebuchadnezzar in 600 BC. The Persians hand dug the first canal between the Nile and the Red Sea starting during the reign of Emperor Nikau II in 600 BC and finished by Emperor Darius I in 500 BC. The next improvement to dredging was the Spoon and Bag dredge, developed by the hoenicians. The workers stayed out of the water and rode on a flat bottomed Phoenicians. The workers stayed out of the water and rode on a flat bottomed barge. The barge had a pivoted lever that had a spoon and bag on one end. When filled with sediment, it was pivoted into the hold of the barge. When the barge was filled with sediment, the workers poled their way to the shore and unloaded the material. The Roman engineers improved the Spoon and Bag dredge by making them much larger. They built hundreds of them, and took them to every port they built throughout Europe, Asia and Africa. The Romans used their ports as a strategic network in order to keep a tight political and economic control over their Empire. The Phoenician Spoon and Bag dredge, seen here in an old woodcut was imitated by the...
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DE-Lecture02-Historical-background - Dredging Engineering...

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