SD-Lecture01-Introduction

SD-Lecture01-Introduction - Soil Dynamics Lecture 01...

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Soil Dynamics Lecture 01 General Concepts
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Most of geotechnical and foundation design is based on the soil’s behavior under static loads. Important structures however, require that highly competent engineers know how to analyze structures under complex dynamic loads. Examples of these dynamic loads are predominantly earthquakes. However, there is an increasing interest on the effects from bomb blasts. Other common dynamic loads are the operation of very heavy or unbalanced machinery, mining, construction (such as pile driving, deep dynamic compaction, etc), heavy traffic, wind and wave actions. Ground motions result in increased settlements, and tilting of the foundations, over and above those calculated via static consolidation theory. Since the 1960’s research has also centered on the damage that ensues from the liquefaction of the soil during a seismic event. The search for oil in deeper and deeper oceans has meant designing offshore platforms that are subject to extreme wave and wind loads. Today’s Miami Herald (6 Sept 2006) mentions finding oil at 18,000 feet depths in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico. In extreme cases earthquake loads are added to very high wave loadings. The study of most dynamic loads show patterns that can be used to simplify their study. Some of these simplifications are shown in the following slides.
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This plot represents the intensity of the load from a low-speed machine versus time upon its foundation.
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The previous real time plot is typically simplified to this type of sinusoidal idealization.
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A simplified loading diagram of the single impact of a steel hammer upon a steel plate.
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course CEG 5905 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '10 term at FIU.

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SD-Lecture01-Introduction - Soil Dynamics Lecture 01...

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