TB-Lecture01-Why-tall-buildings

TB-Lecture01-Why-tall-buildings - EGN-5439 The Design of...

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EGN EGN -5439 The Design of Tall Buildings 5439 The Design of Tall Buildings Lecture 01 Lecture 01 Why Tall Buildings? Why Tall Buildings? © L. A. Prieto-Portar 2008
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Humans have always admired tall structures since ancient times because of their social status: they are visible to all. Their builders were held in the highest respect of their societies, and their structures are the subjects of legends: The early tall buildings: The Seven Wonders of the Ancient World
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The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus
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The Lighthouse of Alexandria
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The Mausoleum at Halycarnasus
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The Hanging Gardens of Babylon
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The Colossus of Rhodes
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The Statue of Zeus at Olympia
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The Great Pyramids of Egypt
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So, in today’s world, what is a Tall Building? Tallness is a relative term. However, for us structural engineers, a tall building is one that is primarily affected by lateral forces from wind and earthquakes . Modern tall buildings were born in 1885 with the first all metal structure of the Home Insurance Building in Chicago. The demand for tall buildings has almost exclusively been for commercial and residential use. Tall commercial buildings have served as prestige symbols for corporations (the Woolworth and Chrysler buildings, Trump Towers, etc.). In Hong Kong and Rio de Janeiro housing is usually 40-story towers spaced only a few meters of each other. The increasing growth of the tourist industry demands taller hotels in city centers where land is scarce and expensive.
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The famous architect Louis Sullivan coined the phrase that in buildings, “ form follows function ”. Perhaps a better phrase that applies to skyscrapers came from Case Gilbert in 1900 (he was the designer of the Woolworth Tower in 1913, the World’s first “skyscraper”). Gilbert said: “ A skyscraper is a machine that makes the land pay .” Gilbert’s assertion is evident in the figure on the left, taken from a real estate publication of 1903. It shows the prices of land values in Lower Manhattan that same year. Practically every firm in New York wanted to be located within a few hundred feet within the tight canyons of Broadway and Wall Street. Notice the contrast of the prices within a few hundred feet (from $400/sf to only $10/sf).
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The Timeline of Structural Growth Ancient Rome Seven-storey wooden tenement buildings of timber and masonry construction. After the great fire of Nero, new brick and concrete materials were used in the form of arch and barrel vault structures. Masonry and timber the two leading materials for the next eighteen centuries.
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course CES 4600 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at FIU.

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TB-Lecture01-Why-tall-buildings - EGN-5439 The Design of...

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