Lecture37 - BioNB 221: Lecture 37 Nov. 21, 2011 Lecture 37:...

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BioNB 221: Lecture 37 Nov. 21, 2011 Lecture 37: Predator Avoidance I: Bluffing and Deterrence Professor Robert Raguso 1. Introduction Avoiding predation is a daily concern for most living things. Many strategies have evolved to enable predator avoidance, touching upon several themes already discussed in this course: mimicry, signal evolution, game theory and cost-benefit analysis. By convention, we consider predators and prey as separate entities, yet all prey species must prey upon some other organism, all but the largest predators also are prey, and no organism can fully escape parasites. Required reading for today: Butterfly Wing Markings are More Advantageous during Handling than during the Initial Strike of an Avian Predator. Mark K. Wourms and Fred E. Wasserman, Evolution, Vol. 39, No. 4 (Jul., 1985), pp. 845- 851 2. Learning Objectives - To appreciate that predator-prey interactions are mediated by aspects of communication; the outcome is often determined by who is best able to
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This note was uploaded on 08/27/2011 for the course BIONB 2210 taught by Professor Seeley during the Fall '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture37 - BioNB 221: Lecture 37 Nov. 21, 2011 Lecture 37:...

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