Lecture41 - BioNB 221: Lecture 41 Dec. 2, 2011 Lecture 41:...

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BioNB 221: Lecture 41 Dec. 2, 2011 Lecture 41: Plant Defense and Communication Professor Robert Raguso 1. Introduction We previously discussed how plants manipulate animals to effect sexual reproduction, using sensory signals produced by flowers. But roots and shoots produce volatile compounds also: are they signals too? Plants defend themselves against a spectrum of stresses and enemies, from UV light to herbivorous animals to fungi and viruses, using specific physiological pathways. These pathways elicit a variety of responses, from the production of toxins (e.g. nicotine) to the emission of volatile “calls for help”. Required Reading: “Volatile Chemical Cues Guide Host Location and Host Selection by Parasitic Plants”, Justin B. Runyon, Mark C. Mescher, Consuelo M. De Moraes, Science, vol. 313: 1964- 1967. 2. Learning Objectives - To compare and contrast plant defensive strategies with those of animals. - To evaluate the evidence that plants actively communicate, either with
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This note was uploaded on 08/27/2011 for the course BIONB 2210 taught by Professor Seeley during the Fall '10 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Lecture41 - BioNB 221: Lecture 41 Dec. 2, 2011 Lecture 41:...

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