Chapter 14 - Notes

Chapter 14 - Notes - Chapter 14 Public Order Crimes:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 14 Public Order Crimes: Legislating Morality Public Order Crimes ______________ crimes or mala prohibitum Violate the prevailing moral rules Prohibit the sale and distribution of selected goods and services e.g. sex, drugs. Debating Morality __________________ view Function of criminal law is to express public morality. Interactionist view Moral definitions change over time. Whose values will be incorporated into law? ___________view Encoding mores and norms into criminal law provides power for the lawmakers, creates insiders and outsiders. Criminal or Immoral? Some immoral behaviour may be _____________ to society e.g. pornography as catharsis. Some criminal behaviour may be regarded as moral e.g. euthanasia. Criminal or Immoral? Some non-criminal behaviour may be very _______________ e.g. tobacco. Some criminal behaviour may not be very harmful. e.g. marijuana. Some laws are difficult to __________. e.g. assisted suicide. Vigilante Justice
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Moral entrepreneurs (Becker) Undertake “________________”to have their values put into law Demonize the offender Encourage “_____________” Illegal Sex Paraphilia ______________________ Pornography Paraphilia “________________” sexual practices focused on: Nonhuman objects (e.g., clothing). Humiliation, torture, masochism. Persons unable to consent (e.g., children, corpses). May be criminal (e.g. indecent exposure) or non-criminal (e.g. consenting adults). Frequently involve ___________members. 26% of sexual assaults. 31% of other sexual offences. Prostitution What historical records reveal. Ancient _______________________ Women provided services to temple priests to encourage fertility. Ancient Greece Prostitutes helped pay for the temple of Aphrodite. Protestant Reform condemned prostitution. English brewery companies used prostitutes to attract customers (19 th century). Prostitution Modern definition ______________________ exchange of sex for money. Not a crime per se. Elements Sexually significant activity. Economic transaction. Emotional indifference. Legal Definitions
Background image of page 2
______________________ for purposes of prostitution. Formerly soliciting. Bawdy-house laws. Transporting or procuring. Living off the avails. Child prostitution.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Incidence and Prevalence __________________. Mostly underground and unreported.
Background image of page 4
Image of page 5
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/28/2011 for the course CRIM 101 taught by Professor Karenbrown during the Spring '11 term at Simon Fraser.

Page1 / 15

Chapter 14 - Notes - Chapter 14 Public Order Crimes:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online