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1-colton-1 - Chapter 1 Size and Shape in Biology Thomas F....

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Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) ~ http://www.zoo.utoronto.ca/able 1 Chapter 1 Size and Shape in Biology Thomas F. Colton* Biological Sciences Collegiate Division The University of Chicago 924 E. 57th Street Chicago, IL 60637-5415 *Current address: University of California, Berkeley Department of Integrative Biology 3060 Valley Life Sciences Building # 3140 Berkeley CA 94720-3140 Phone: (510) 642-3549 tcolton@socrates.berkeley.edu Tom Colton received a B.A. in biology from the State University of New York at Binghamton, in 1977 and a Ph.D. in Zoology from Duke University in 1983. Since then he has taught at Duke University, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Wake Forest University. As a senior lecturer at the University of Chicago since 1991, he teaches labs in biological diversity, physiology, and biomechanics, lectures in a biology course for non-majors, and directs the web site for the undergraduate biology program. © 1999 The University of Chicago Contents Reprinted From: Colton, T. F. 1999. Diversity of photosynthetic pigments. Pages 1-44, in Tested studies for laboratory teaching, Volume 20 (S. J. Karcher, Editor). Proceedings of the 20 th Workshop/Conference of the Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE), 399 pages. - Copyright policy: http://www.zoo.utoronto.ca/able/volumes/copyright.htm Although the laboratory exercises in ABLE proceedings volumes have been tested and due consideration has been given to safety, individuals performing these exercises must assume all responsibility for risk. The Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) disclaims any liability with regards to safety in connection with the use of the exercises in its proceedings volumes.
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2 Size and Shape in Biology Introduction. ................................................................................................................... 2 Materials . ....................................................................................................................... 3 Notes for the Instructor. ................................................................................................. 4 Student Outline . ............................................................................................................. 5 Overview. ................................................................................................................. 5 Background. ............................................................................................................. 5 Scaling Exercises. .................................................................................................... 6 Scaling Exercise 1: Mussel Shells. .................................................................... 7 Scaling Exercise 2: Stress and the Human Foot. ............................................... 8 Scaling Exercise 3: Ruminant Jaws. .................................................................. 11 Scaling Exercise 4: Cat Jaws. ............................................................................ 14 Scaling Exercise 5: The Cat Cranium. ............................................................... 17 Scaling Exercise 6: Dog and Wolf Skulls. ......................................................... 19 Scaling Exercise 7: Mammalian Femurs . .......................................................... 21 Using StatView 4.5 to Analyze Scaling Data. ......................................................... 22 Acknowledgements. ....................................................................................................... 24 Literature Cited. ............................................................................................................. 24 Appendix A: Pre-Lab Tutorial. ...................................................................................... 26 Appendix B: Notes and Expected Results for Each Exercise. ....................................... 37 Introduction This is the first lab in a biological diversity course for second-year biology majors at the University of Chicago, though I developed it originally for a non-majors course on the biology of motion. This lab might also be appropriate for courses in anatomy, biomechanics, and evolutionary biology. The goals of this lab are to (1) stimulate students to think about the implications of size for an organism's form and function as they encounter various phyla in subsequent labs, (2) provide experience working in groups to develop hypotheses, take measurements, analyze data, and present results orally, (3) teach the use of linear regression to describe patterns and test hypotheses, and (4) introduce the concepts of isometric and allometric scaling, the relationship of body size
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1-colton-1 - Chapter 1 Size and Shape in Biology Thomas F....

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