4-goldman0

4-goldman0 - Chapter 4 Principles of Allometry Corey A....

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Chapter 4 Principles of Allometry Corey A. Goldman 1 , Richard R. Snell 2 Jeffrey J. Thomason 3 , and David Bartholomew Brown 2 1 Departments of Botany and Zoology University of Toronto 25 Harbord Street Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 2 Department of Zoology University of Toronto Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 3 College of Osteopathic Medicine Ohio University Athens, Ohio 45701 Corey Goldman (M.Sc., Toronto, 1983), editor of these proceedings, has been academic coordinator for the introductory biology course at U of T since 1983. His research interests are mammalian taxonomy and systematics. Richard Snell (Ph.D., Toronto, 1989) is at the National Museum of Natural Science, Ottawa, on a Visiting Fellowship. His research interests involve evaluating intrapopulational variability and investigating evolutionary relationships and biogeographic patterning in squirrels and larid gulls. Jeff Thomason's (Ph.D, Toronto, 1984) doctoral research was on the changes in the mechanical function of the feet of horses during their evolution. Following graduation he bought a computer and started to learn programming; some programs were incorporated in his post-doctoral studies at the University of Calgary on the facial mechanics of mammals. Jeff now uses computers extensively for research and in the classroom, particularly for kinematic and kinetic analyses in a course on animal locomotion. David Bartholomew Brown is a Ph.D. student in Zoology at U of T. His primary research interests are in spatial population dynamics and the evolution of complexity. He has been involved with cellular automata and is considering the combined use of cellular automata, moveable finite automata, and L systems as an educational tool to illustrate biological complexity. © 1990 Corey A. Goldman, Richard R. Snell, Jeffrey J. Thomason, and David Bartholomew Brown 43 Association for Biology Laboratory Education (ABLE) ~ http://www.zoo.utoronto.ca/able
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44 Allometry Contents Introduction. ................................................................................................................... 44 Notes for the Instructor. ................................................................................................. 45 Student Outline . ............................................................................................................. 48 Literature Cited. ............................................................................................................. 58 Appendices A to H. ........................................................................................................ 59 Introduction In this computer-assisted exercise students explore the fundamental concept of allometry (the study of size and its consequences), examine the relationship between size and shape, and learn how to quantify changes in proportions. Specifically, they investigate how mammals of various sizes change proportions to compensate for changes of surface area and volume. Interactive computer programs aid each student in calculating standard dimensions from an illustration of an animal,
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4-goldman0 - Chapter 4 Principles of Allometry Corey A....

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