Aristotle and Kane - 1 Voluntary actions act originated by the doer with the knowledge of the particular circumstances of the act-Related to

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Philosophy 11-16-10 Bob Kane: Through the Moral Maze 1. Central thesis: Pluralism- diversity of points of view- led to relativism – the view that there are no objective r absolute values that hold for all persons at all times- but not necessarily so and leads to the loss of moral innocence and uncertainty 2. Loss of moral innocence and uncertainty leads to openness and tolerance ( good ) but it does not lead to an openness of indifference ( negative ) ( letting people believe what they want and believing what you want ) 3. Thoughtful people conclude that some things are universally right and others wrong based on instincts. 4. Any culture is right in its view is problematic because it suggest we cannot criticize or blame other cultures 5. Majority rule is wrong because majority may be wrong 6. Soft universalism- all cultures have at least some values in common even if they are buried beneath layers of different behavioral patterns Aristotle: Voluntary and Involuntary action
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Unformatted text preview: 1. Voluntary actions: act originated by the doer with the knowledge of the particular circumstances of the act-Related to compulsion: more voluntary than involuntary. Desired and chosen at the time done. Involuntary in itself but voluntary when given an alternative-Related to ignorance: ignorance of right and wrong. 2. Involuntary actions: an act done under compulsion or through ignorance when the agent does not understand the particular circumstances involved and is pained after the fact-Under compulsion- cause lies outside the agent contributes nothing to the action does not understand the particular circumstances involved and is pained and sorry afterwards. -Through ignorance of particular circumstances: ex. Talking about a subject not known to be forbidden -Those that are ignorant of particulars act involuntarily through: doers, deed, object or person affected by it, way in which something Is done...
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course PHI 2010 taught by Professor Stanlick during the Fall '08 term at University of Central Florida.

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