Pol 51 lecture 5

Pol 51 lecture 5 - Pol 51 Lecture 5 Research Design We need...

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Pol 51, Lecture 5 Research Design We need to make good comparisons. We talked about the “bottom line”. Bivariate approaches are simple, but it can be misleading. Keep in mind the bivariate examples: breast cancer patients who opt for different treatments, participants in a school choice. We want to try and avoid faulty comparisons. Research design : it’s a strategy for getting over the 4 hurdles, making causal inferences. Let’s say we have a theory that says that X causes Y, but we don’t know whether, in reality, X causes Y. We may have theories that suggest it, but theories can be and are often wrong. We test X causes Y with research designs. The goal of all types of research designs are to help us evaluate how well a theory is. o Two Approaches 1) Experimental Design: benchmark of scientific research a. Example: suppose that you’re the ceo of pharm company and scientific team discovered new drug to help blood pressure. It was tested on rats and now we have to test it on people. Researchers in the physical sciences want to actually test the drug, but how can we find out if the drug(X) causes patients to have lower blood pressure(Y)? We have to consider that there are all kinds of external reasons (Z) that
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Pol 51 lecture 5 - Pol 51 Lecture 5 Research Design We need...

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