RCRs and Reference Examples

RCRs and Reference Examples - Accommodating Workplace Needs...

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Accommodating Workplace Needs with a Web-based Software Engineering Tutorial by Jeffrey S. Appel A dissertation preliminary proposal submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy School of Computer and Information Sciences Nova Southeastern University 2001
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Problem Statement and Goal This will be a study that is concerned with the teaching of Software Engineering (SE) principles in the Computer Science (CS) curriculum and the value of that education to the software development industry. SE is defined by the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) as: (1) the application of a systematic, disciplined, quantifiable approach to the development, operation, and maintenance of software; that is, the application of engineering to software, and (2) the study of approaches as in (1) (IEEE610.12, 1993; Pressman, 2000a). Two schools of thought with regards to the purpose of CS education are cognitive enhancement and occupational preparation. Ben- Ari and Kolikant (1999) describe several goals of teaching CS that include helping students to become science literate, developing critical and creative thinking skills, and improving the learner’s overall mental processes. Bagert, Hilburn, Hislop, Mead, Mengel, and Saiedian (1999), recognized leaders in the field of SE, provided individual position statements on CS education. Hilburn’s position statement in this report discussed the importance of teaching SE to CS students to prepare them with skills that industry needs. This paper concentrates on the professional preparation aspect of the discussion. A reasonable starting place would be an examination of the CS curricula and the role of SE in that structure. There are many curriculum formats taught at colleges and universities throughout the United States. Most of them are based on the Criteria for Accrediting Programs in Computer Science in the United States (CSAB, 2000) and the Association of Computing
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Machinery/Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (ACM/IEEE) Joint Curriculum Task Force Report, which is called Computing Curricula 1991 (ACM/IEEE- CS, 1991; Bryant, 1999; Tucker, 1991; Tucker & Barnes, 1991). The Computing Curricula 1991 relates detailed course content guidance that is not found in the CSAB accrediting criteria, but the information is old and needs to be updated (El-Kadi, 1999). The revision effort is called Curriculum 2001 and promises to correct several of the shortcomings that have limited the effectiveness of the Computing Curricula 1991 Computer Science has traditionally been taught with SE included as one of the nine subcategories that are considered the core of a CS curriculum (Bagert, 1998). These core courses are as follows: 1. Algorithms and Data Structures 2. Architecture 3. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics 4. Database and Information Retrieval 5. Human-Computer Communication 6. Numerical and Symbolic Computation
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course TMG 620 taught by Professor Dr.jeffreys.appel during the Spring '11 term at National.

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RCRs and Reference Examples - Accommodating Workplace Needs...

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