Concussions - Anna Gomenyuk Psychology 101 Concussions...

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Anna Gomenyuk Psychology 101 Concussions February 4, 2010 Concussions are more serious than they are believed to be. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that there are 1.6 to 3.8 million concussions per year. A concussion is also known as a mild traumatic brain injury. It is caused by hitting the head against a hard surface, shaking, or spinning. The brain, in the cerebrospinal fluid, is clashed against the skull causing damage and changes in how the cells of the brain function. Many symptoms follow concussions, such as: loss of consciousness, headache, nausea, blurred vision, confusion, dizziness, loss of balance, lightheadedness, ringing in the year, fatigue, memory problems, and inability to see or think properly. Severe concussions can cause convulsions, seizures, vomiting, weaknesses, numbness, and inability to wake up. Repeated concussions are more severe. They can cause vascular congestion and increased intracranial pressure, which produces acute brain swelling. Therefore, this is known as the second impact
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Concussions - Anna Gomenyuk Psychology 101 Concussions...

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