Chapter 3 Understanding the Boot Process and Command Line

Chapter 3 Understanding the Boot Process and Command Line -...

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Understanding the Boot Process and Command Line Chapter #3 Amy Hissom Key Terms 1. Active Partition – the primary partition on the hard drive that boots the OS. Windows NT/2000/XP calls the active partition the system partition. 2. Autoexec.bat – Stands for automatically executed batch file, the file that DOS automatically executes when a computer boots up. This is a convenient place to put commands you always want to execute at the beginning of a computing session. For example, you can set system parameters such as the date and time, and install memory-resident programs. 3 . Batch File – A file that contains a sequence, or batch, of commands. Batch files are useful for storing sets of commands that are always executed together because you can simply enter the name of the batch file instead of entering each command individually. 4. Boot Record – The first sector of a floppy disk or logical drive in a partition; it contains information about the disk or logical drive. On a hard drive, if the boot record is in the active partition, then it is used to boot the OS. Also called boot sector. 5. Bootable Disk – For DOS and Windows, a floppy disk that can upload the OS files necessary for computer startup. For DOS or windows 9x/Me, it must contain the files Io.sys, Msdos.sys, and Command.com. 6. Booting – Comes from the phrase “lifting yourself up by your bootstraps” and refers to the computer bringing itself up to an operable state without user intervention. Refers to either a “soft boot” or a “hard boot”. 7. Cabinet File – A file with a .cab extension that contains one or more compressed files and is often used to distribute software on a disk. The Extract command is used to extract files from the cabinet file. 8. CD (change directory) command – A command given at the command prompt that changes the default directory, for example CD\Windows. 9. Cold boot – (Same as a hard boot) Restart the computer by turning off the power or by pressing the restart button. 10. Command.com – Along with Msdos.sys and Io.sys, one of the three files that are the core components of the real-mode portion of Windows 9x/Me. Command.com provides a command prompt and interprets commands. 11. DOS box – A command window. 12. Emergency Startup disk (ESD) – (Same as a rescue disk or startup disk) A floppy disk that can be used to start up a computer when the hard drive fails to boot. 13. External Command – Commands that have their own program files.
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14. Fragmented File – A file that has been written to different portions of the disk so that it is not in contiguous clusters. 15. Hard Boot – (Same as a cold boot) Restart the computer by turning off the power or by pressing the restart button. 16.
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Chapter 3 Understanding the Boot Process and Command Line -...

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