Chapter 11 Multimedia Devices and Mass Storage

Chapter 11 Multimedia Devices and Mass Storage - Multimedia...

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Multimedia Devices and Mass Storage Chapter #11 Amy Hissom Key Terms Array basic disk — A way to partition a hard drive, used by DOS and all versions of Windows, that stores information about the drive in a partition table at the beginning of the drive. Compare to dynamic disk. CDFS (Compact Disc File System) — The 32-bit file system for CD discs and some CD-R and CD-RW discs that replaced the older 16-bit mscdex file system used by DOS. See also Universal Disk Format (UDF). CD-R (CD-recordable) — A CD drive that can record or write data to a CD. The drive may or may not be multisession, but the data cannot be erased once it is written. CD-RW (CD-rewritable) — A CD drive that can record or write data to a CD. The data can be erased and overwritten. The drive may or may not be multisession. constant angular velocity (CAV) — A technology used by hard drives and newer CD-ROM drives whereby the disk rotates at a constant speed. constant linear velocity (CLV) — A CD-ROM format in which the spacing of data is consistent on the CD, but the speed of the disc varies depending on whether the data being read near the center or the edge of the disc. data cartridge — A type of tape medium typically used for backups. Full-sized data cartridges are 4 × 6 2_ inches in size. A minicartridge is only 3¼ × 2½ 2_ inches in size. drop height — The height from which a manufacturer states that its drive can be dropped without making the drive unusable. DVD (digital video disc or digital versatile disk) — A faster, larger CD format that can read older CDs, store over 8 GB of data, and hold full-length motion picture videos. dynamic disk — A way to partition one or more hard drives, introduced with Windows 2000, in which information about the drive is stored in a database at the end of the drive. Compare to basic disk. dynamic volume — A volume type used with dynamic disks for which you can change the size of the volume after you have created it. fault tolerance — The degree to which a system can tolerate failures. Adding redundant components, such as disk mirroring or disk duplexing, is a way to build in fault tolerance. half life — The time it takes for a medium storing data to weaken to half of its strength. Magnetic media, including traditional hard drives and floppy disks, have a half-life of five to seven years. hertz (Hz) — Unit of measurement for frequency, calculated in terms of vibrations, or cycles per second. For example, for 16-bit stereo sound, a frequency of 44,000 Hz is used. See also megahertz.
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JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group ) — A graphical compression scheme that allows the user to
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Chapter 11 Multimedia Devices and Mass Storage - Multimedia...

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