L16-earth_pressures_rankine

L16-earth_pressures_rankine - 1 16. EARTH PRESSURES...

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16. EARTH PRESSURES (Rankine’s Method) 16.1 Modes of failure F Some force is required to support the soil. This force may be provided by friction at the base (gravity retaining walls) founding the wall into the ground (sheet retaining walls) anchors and struts external loads If the force is too small the soil behind the wall will reach a state of failure with the wall moving away from the soil (active failure). If the force is too large the soil will reach another state of failure with the wall moving into the soil (passive failure). Rankine’s theory allows the limiting pressures on retaining walls to be determined. 16.2 Rankine’s theory In Rankine’s method it is assumed that the wall is frictionless. The normal stress acting on the wall will therefore be a principal stress. If the wall is vertical and the soil surface horizontal, the vertical and horizontal stresses throughout the retained soil mass will be principal stresses. In this situation the vertical stress at any depth can be simply determined, as follows: 1
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d 1 d 2 γ 1 γ 2 z The horizontal stress can then be calculated from the Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion. If short term stability is being considered this can be achieved using undrained (total stress) parameters while if long term stability is being considered drained (effective stress) parameters must be used. From Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion we can write for soil at failure 1 3 = N + 2 c N σ σ φ φ The implications of this expression are most easily investigated by considering the response of soil adjacent to a frictionless retaining wall. Then we can identify two limiting conditions: 16.2.1 Active failure There is insufficient force to support the soil. Assuming that the vertical stress is given simply by the weight of the overlying soil and does not change during deformation, the minimum horizontal stress may be determined from hmin v = - 2 c N N σ σ φ φ 16.2.2 Passive failure The force on the wall is greater than the resistance provided by the soil. The horizontal stress reaches a maximum value given by hmax v = N + 2 c N σ σ φ φ In the Rankine method a stress state is found that is in equilibrium with the applied loads and has the soil at failure. In plasticity theory this approach is referred to as a lower bound method, a method which can be shown to produce safe, conservative solutions.
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course CIVL 2410 taught by Professor Dairey during the Three '11 term at University of Sydney.

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L16-earth_pressures_rankine - 1 16. EARTH PRESSURES...

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