DOC 1 Lecture Notes 1022

DOC 1 Lecture Notes 1022 - DOC 1 Lecture Notes 10/22/10...

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DOC 1 Lecture Notes 10/22/10 Lorber reading SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION… - Gender is such a familiar part of daily life that it usually takes a deliberate disruption of our expectations of how women and men are supposed to act to pay attention to how it is produced. - Gender signs and signals are so ubiquitous that we usually fail to note them – unless they are missing ambiguous. - Gender, like culture, is a human production that depends on everyone constantly “doing gender” [performing] - Dominant gender ideology is patriarchy (men > women) - Western society’s values legitimate gendering by claiming that it all comes from physiology – female and male procreative difference. But gender and sex are not equivalent, and gender as a social construction does not flow atomatically from genitalia and reproductive organs - Sex becomes gender thru ideological practices that then create the gender markers (blue for boys and pink for girls) - In the construction of ascribed social statuses, physiological differences like sex, stage of development, color of skin, and size are crude markers (somatics). They are not the source of the social statuses of gender, age grade, and race. Social statuses are carefully constructed through prescribed processes of teaching, learning, emulation, and enforcement. - Gender cannot be equated with biological and physiological differences between human females and males. The building blocks of gender are socially constructed statuses. Western societies have only two genders,
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DOC 1 Lecture Notes 1022 - DOC 1 Lecture Notes 10/22/10...

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