Chem. II Lab- The Applied Chemistry of Soapmaking

Chem. II Lab- The Applied Chemistry of Soapmaking -...

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Lab Report Devon Corcoran Chem. II Lab Dr. Ward The Applied Chemistry of Soapmaking Introduction A soap molecule is a derivative of a class of organic molecules called carboxylic acids, or fatty acids. Fatty acids are long chains of carbon atoms with a carboxylic acid group at one end. A shorthand way of writing out fatty acids is to draw them out this way; Every line represents a bond, every intersection of two lines represents a carbon atom, and all the missing bonds are to hydrogen. All fats and oil molecules have variations of the same structure; long strings of hydrocarbons with one polar end. Fats and oils can be hydrolyzed, or broken apart, using either water, or a base such as NaOH. Using a base to break apart a fat is called base-catalyzed hydrolysis. When tristearin undergoes base-catalyzed hydrolysis with NaOH, the resulting compounds are glycerol and sodium stearate rather than the glycerol and stearic acid that results from normal hydrolyzation. Sodium stearate is different from stearic acid in that in sodium stearate, the carboxylic acid group is missing one hydrogen, which leaves a negatively charged oxygen ion on the end, which the positively charged sodium ion then attaches itself to in order to balance out
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course SCIENCE 1001921 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Chem. II Lab- The Applied Chemistry of Soapmaking -...

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