Chem. II Lab- A Study of Viscosity

Chem. II Lab- A Study of Viscosity - Lab Report Devon...

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Unformatted text preview: Lab Report Devon Corcoran Chem. II Lab Dr. Ward A Study of Viscosity Introduction Liquids have many different properties. One of these properties is viscosity, or resistance to flow. Things like water, milk, fruit juice, and other hydrocarbons have low viscosities and flow easily, while things like motor oil, honey, molasses, and liquid soap have higher viscosities and do not flow so quickly. Polymers, compounds with high molecular weights, are often studied using viscosity. The more the molecules in a liquid compound interact with each other, the more viscous they are and the more they resist flow. Molecules with a higher molecular weight often become entangled, and other molecules have the attractions of van der Waals forces such as London dispersion, ion- dipole, dipole-dipole, and hydrogen bonding. The time it takes for s solution to flow between two points is called efflux time. Efflux time is effected by both temperature and viscosity, where higher temperatures and lower viscosities yield faster efflux times, and higher viscosities and lower temperatures yield much slower efflux times. The relative viscosity, ( rel ), is defined as the time of efflux for the solution, (...
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Chem. II Lab- A Study of Viscosity - Lab Report Devon...

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