OUTLINE FOR ARCHAIC GREEK SCULPTURE AND PAINTING

OUTLINE FOR ARCHAIC GREEK SCULPTURE AND PAINTING - OUTLINE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
OUTLINE FOR ARCHAIC GREEK SCULPTURE AND PAINTING Owing to the good services of Greek mercenaries, in the early seventh century B.C. an Egyptian pharaoh gave the Greeks two settlements in the Nile Delta. The Greek artists attracted to these settlements learned much from the Egyptians, especially the ability to construct buildings of stone and statues of both stone and hollow-cast bronze. Archaic Greek statues of standing men are called kouroi (pl.) or kouros (sing.) and are one of the few images Greek artists borrow from Egypt. They superficially resemble their Egyptian counterparts, but differ in intention or meaning and development. Unlike Egyptian standing male statues, Greek examples are nude, completely free-standing (i.e. unattached at the back to the original block of stone), and, at least initially, more abstract, sacrificing the sense of organic continuity present in the Egyptian statue for an attempt to represent the anatomical components individually. Greek statues did not serve as alternate bodies for the ka to inhabit, but could instead be used as cult images of the gods in their temples; as public markers or monuments over graves or tombs; or be dedicated in sanctuaries as pleasing offerings, agalmata (pl.) agalma (sing.), to the gods. Unlike their Egyptian counterparts, too, they develop quickly from abstract beginnings (ca. 650 B.C.) to naturalistic ends (ca. 480 B.C.). Examples: Metropolitan Kouros , ca. 600 B.C. ( Stokstad fig. 5-14 and website images) vs. Kouros from Akragas (Agrigento, Sicily ), ca. 490/480 B.C.(website images). The Akragas kouros represents the last stage in the development of the type. Having solved all the problems inherent in it, Greek artists dissolved the type and began to pose new problems for themselves as can be seen in the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course ART HIST 105 taught by Professor Kenfeild-weingert during the Fall '08 term at Rutgers.

Page1 / 3

OUTLINE FOR ARCHAIC GREEK SCULPTURE AND PAINTING - OUTLINE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online