Chapter 6 part II

Chapter 6 part II -...

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Which of the following is usually not measured in a  polygraph examination? (p. 151) A.blood pressure B.salivary response C.respiration D.heart rate E. electrodermal activity on the skin surface
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The other race effect refers to the idea that (p. 120) A.  eyewitnesses are usually better at recognizing and  identifying members of their own race or ethnic group than  members of another race or ethnic group. B.  those selecting a jury should strive to have jurors who are  the same race or ethnicity as the defendant. C.  those creating a line-up should make sure that all the  distractors (i.e., non-suspects) are not of another race from  the stated race of the suspect. D.  eyewitnesses are usually worse at recognizing and  identifying members of their own race or ethnic group than  members of another race or ethnic group.
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Which of the following is true? (p. 121, WWW) A.  Current evidence suggests that women as opposed to  men are much more likely to make accurate eyewitness  identifications. B.  Current evidence suggests that men as opposed to  women are much more likely to make accurate  eyewitness identifications. C.  Current evidence suggests that neither gender is  superior to the other with regard to making accurate  eyewitness identifications. D.  None of the above is true as surprisingly, researchers  have not yet investigated this topic.
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When the police capture suspects, one of their 1 st   acts is to encourage a confession. A confession permits a district attorney or grand jury to  bring charges. Even if the suspect later recants, the  confession can be introduced into evidence at the trial. Many “confessions” result from intense questioning by the  police—interrogations that may involve promises, threats,  harassment, or even brutality.  Evaluating Confessions
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One of the best-known U.S. Supreme Court cases,  Miranda v. Arizona  (1966), dealt with the problem  of coerced confessions. As a result of the  Miranda   decision, the police must warn suspects of certain  rights before starting a custodial interrogation. If  these procedures are not followed, any damaging  admissions made by suspects cannot be used by the  prosecution in a trial.
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course SOP 4842 taught by Professor Reardon during the Spring '08 term at FIU.

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Chapter 6 part II -...

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