Chapter 11 (1)

Chapter 11 (1) - The term venire refers to ...

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Unformatted text preview: The term venire refers to  A. the source of names of people drawn for jury duty (such as drivers license lists).  B. the panel of potential jurors.  C. the process of jury selection (i.e., questioning by the judge or attorneys).  D. the actual jury chosen to hear the case. First, officials assemble a panel, or venire , of prospective jurors.  Jury selection must neither systematically eliminate nor underrepresent any subgroups of the population. To encourage representativeness, U.S. Supreme Court cases (e.g., Strauder v. West Virginia , 1880) have forbidden systematic or intentional exclusion of religious, racial, and other cognizable groups from jury panels. Jury Selection Judicial and Legislative Reforms Congress and the Supreme Court require that the jury pool be a representative cross section of the community. The resulting juries would be more heterogeneous and heterogeneous juries are expected to be better fact finders and problem solvers. Sommers (2006): examined the effect of racial heterogeneity on jury deliberations. 1. mixed-race groups had longer, more thorough deliberations and were more likely to discuss racially charged topics (e.g., racial profiling) 2. white jurors on racially mixed juries mentioned more factual information and were more aware of racial concerns than were their counterparts on all-white jurors. Jury Selection Judicial and Legislative Reforms  Representativeness gives the appearance of fairness and legitimacy of a trial and of the resulting verdict.  Page 275. Forming the Venire The Jury Selection and Service Act (1968) required that voter registration lists be used as the primary source for jury pool selection, but such lists risk underrepresenting certain segments of the community. To increase representativeness, states use other sources such as lists of licensed drivers, persons receiving public assistance, and unemployment lists. Exclusions, Nonresponses, and Exemptions: Threats to Representativeness? Once a pool of potential jurors has been drawn, each individual in the pool receives a questionnaire to assess his or her qualifications and ability to serve. Some are excluded by law (e.g., those who are blind). Exclusions, Nonresponses, and Exemptions: Threats to Representativeness? From those eligible for jury service and who return the questionnaire, members of the venire are randomly selected and summoned to appear jury service. Jury Selection Exclusions, Nonresponses, and Exemptions: Threats to Representativeness?...
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course SOP 4842 taught by Professor Reardon during the Spring '08 term at FIU.

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Chapter 11 (1) - The term venire refers to ...

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