Chapter 13 part 1

Chapter 13 part 1 - Perception of Victims

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While most individuals feel sympathy toward  victims who have experienced crime and/or  violence, sometimes others blame victims for their  plight. One reason for this inclination is the need to  believe in a “just world.”  Perception of Victims
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In 2006, approximately 25 million criminal  victimizations occurred:  More than 18.9 million involved  property crimes  (a rate of  160 incidents per 1000 households), and over 6.1 million  were  crimes of violence  (25 incidents per 1000 persons).
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In 2006, approximately 25 million criminal  victimizations occurred:  Acts of  sexual orientation discrimination  also occur with  some frequency: 90% of gay men report having been  threatened or subjected to verbal abuse, and more than  33% were victims of violence. Types of Victims
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This chapter concentrates on three types of  victims and the effects of victimization on them:  1) targets of sexual harassment,  2) battered women, and  3) victims of violent crime—particularly rape, the violent  crime that has been studied most often. 
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Recently, many have acknowledged the need to  recognize and serve crime victims. For example, since the late 1970’s: The interdisciplinary field of  victimology  has emerged,  There is increasing availability of services to crime victims,  including compensation, There is expanded opportunity for victims to participate in  the trials of their victimizers, and There is heightened focus on victims brought about by new  journals.
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  Consequences of Early Victimization Widom (e.g., 1989) has found that abused or neglected  children were significantly more likely than a comparison  group to have been arrested for violent crimes as  juveniles or as adults. 
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Individuals who suffer a severe trauma and later  experience intense, fear-related reactions when  reminded of the trauma, may be experiencing  posttraumatic stress disorder  (PTSD). Violent Victimization and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) The symptoms of PTSD include (symptoms must last  longer than one month): Frequent reexperiencing of the event (e.g., flashbacks and  repeated nightmares), Persistent avoidance of stimuli associated with the trauma  and a general numbing or deadening of emotions, and Increased physiological arousal resulting in exaggerated  startle responses or difficulty sleeping. Violent Victimization and
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course SOP 4842 taught by Professor Reardon during the Spring '08 term at FIU.

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Chapter 13 part 1 - Perception of Victims

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