Afterviewing Questions 3

Afterviewing Questions 3 - Sharon Ng ICS 9 7/6/11 Ep. 3...

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Sharon Ng ICS 9 7/6/11 Ep. 3 After Viewing Questions 1. Who was allowed to become a naturalized citizen before 1954 and who wasn’t? What rights and privileges do citizens have that non-citizens don't have? What were the consequences for those denied citizenship? Whiteness was key to citizenship. Most of these individuals were Caucasian, and at the time, it was hard to be classified as white. For example, Ozawa petitioned for citizenship and even though he was fair skinned and practiced many American customs, people said he wasn’t white because he wasn’t Caucasian; he was of the Mongolian race. Only free white immigrants could be naturalized citizen. People of African descent also got it after the war. Only whites got to participate in political activities and got better paying jobs. To be white, it was to gain the full rewards of citizenship. The government had to make decisions on who was white and who wasn’t. The south enforced Jim Crow segregation and the government had to determine who was Black and who wasn’t. Those denied of citizenship did not get the great benefits the white people
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course ICS 9 taught by Professor Parker during the Summer '11 term at DeAnza College.

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Afterviewing Questions 3 - Sharon Ng ICS 9 7/6/11 Ep. 3...

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