Making Batteries

Making Batteries - the substances reacted with the copper...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Making Batteries July 8, 2009 Power supply Potential difference Current (A) Resistance Potato 0.830 88.5 1.208 Fruit [Lemon] 0.995 51.5 3.475 Soda 0.966 208.6 204.3 Potato + fruit + soda 2.842 88.1 2.014 Questions 1) The electrode at the “high” potential is copper. The electrode at the “low” potential is  zinc. 2) The electrode that collects the positive charge is copper. The electrode that collects the  negative charge is zinc. I can tell because when the voltmeter wires are switched, it  measures zero. 3) The value for potential difference, resistance, and/or current will change if I reposition  the electrodes at different distances because the farther apart they are, the greater the  difference. A bigger difference would mean more current, and less resistance. 4) The values for potential difference, resistance, or current changed because when the  copper and zinc were placed in the potato, fruit, soda, and all of the above, the acids of 
Background image of page 1
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: the substances reacted with the copper and zinc, making the substances less acidic overall, thus the changes. 5) The battery with the largest potential difference is the one with the potato, fruit, and soda. 6) The battery with the largest current is the soda. 7) The battery with the greatest internal resistance is the soda. 8) The individual measurements for the potential difference across each of the batteries in the circuit added together are slightly less than the potential difference of the potato + fruit + soda. The individual measurements added together add up to 2.791. The potato + fruit + soda power supply seems to be acting as one super battery because there is more accumulated acid to react with for the zinc and copper....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course PHYS 10 taught by Professor Vaughn during the Summer '09 term at West Valley.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online