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s-asym - ASYMMETRIC ENCRYPTION 1 135 Recommended Book...

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ASYMMETRIC ENCRYPTION 1 / 135
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Recommended Book Steven Levy. Crypto . Penguin books. 2001. A non-technical account of the history of public-key cryptography and the colorful characters involved. 2 / 135
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Recall Symmetric Cryptography Before Alice and Bob can communicate securely, they need to have a common secret key K AB . If Alice wishes to also communicate with Charlie then she and Charlie must also have another common secret key K AC . If Alice generates K AB , K AC , they must be communicated to her partners over private and authenticated channels. 3 / 135
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Public Key Encryption Alice has a secret key that is shared with nobody, and an associated public key that is known to everybody. Anyone (Bob, Charlie, . . . ) can use Alice’s public key to send her an encrypted message which only she can decrypt. Think of the public key like a phone number that you can look up in a database 4 / 135
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Public Key Encryption Alice has a secret key that is shared with nobody, and an associated public key that is known to everybody. Anyone (Bob, Charlie, . . . ) can use Alice’s public key to send her an encrypted message which only she can decrypt. Think of the public key like a phone number that you can look up in a database Senders don’t need secrets There are no shared secrets 4 / 135
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Syntax of PKE A public-key (or asymmetric) encryption scheme AE = ( K , E , D ) consists of three algorithms, where E M D M or sk K C C pk A 5 / 135
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How it Works Step 1 : Key generation Alice locally computers ( pk , sk ) $ ← K and stores sk . Step 2 : Alice enables any prospective sender to get pk . Step 3 : The sender encrypts under pk and Alice decrypts under sk . We don’t require privacy of pk but we do require authenticity: the sender should be assured pk is really Alice’s key and not someone else’s. One could Put public keys in a trusted but public “phone book”, say a cryptographic DNS. Use certificates as we will see later. 6 / 135
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Security of PKE Schemes: Issues The issues are the same as for symmetric encryption: Want general purpose schemes Security should not rely on assumptions about usage setting Want to prevent leakage of partial information about plaintexts 7 / 135
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Security requirements Suppose sender computes C 1 $ ← E pk ( M 1 ) ; · · · ; C q $ ← E pk ( M q ) Adversary A has C 1 , . . . , C q What if A Retrieves sk Bad! Retrieves M 1 Bad! But also ... 8 / 135
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Security requirements We want to hide all partial information about the data stream. Examples of partial information: Does M 1 = M 2 ? What is first bit of M 1 ? What is XOR of first bits of M 1 , M 2 ? 9 / 135
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Security requirements We want to hide all partial information about the data stream. Examples of partial information: Does M 1 = M 2 ? What is first bit of M 1 ? What is XOR of first bits of M 1 , M 2 ?
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