CSE91 - Distributed Computing Principles Keith Marzullo Its...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Distributed Computing Principles Keith Marzullo
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2 It’s all about distributed systems now… QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTimeª and a decompres or are ne ded to se this picture.
Background image of page 2
3 What do they have in common? Independent processors that communicate via a narrow interface. Contrast with shared memory. True concurrency. Contrast with multitasking. Partial failures Things get messy when only parts of the system stop working. Things can get really messy when parts of the system can try to do bad things.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4 Partial failures and availability Leslie Lamport at DEC SRC in 1980s A distributed system is one in which the failure of a computer you didn’t even know existed can render your own computer unusable.
Background image of page 4
5 Partial failures Assume five computers crash and recover independently, and each crashed about 4 minutes a month (probability up = 0.9999). Probability all up? Probability one up? QuickTimeª and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 Partial failures Assume five computers crash and recover independently, and each crashed about 4 minutes a month (probability up = 0.9999). Probability 5 up?
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course CSE 91 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 39

CSE91 - Distributed Computing Principles Keith Marzullo Its...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online