ECE602_lecture_09_04

ECE602_lecture_09_04 - Modeling Biosystems Mathematical...

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Unformatted text preview: Modeling Biosystems Mathematical models are tools that biomedical engineers use to predict the behavior of the system. Three different states are modeled Steady-state behavior Behavior over a finite period of time Transient behavior Modeling Biosystems Modeling in BME needs an interdisciplinary approach. Electrical Engineering: circuits and systems; imaging and image processing; instrumentation and measurements; sensors. Mechanical Engineering: fluid and solid mechanics; heat transfer; robotics and automation; thermodynamics. Chemical Engineering: transport phenomena; polymers and materials; biotechnology; drug design; pharmaceutical manufacturing Medicine and biology: biological concepts of anatomy and physiology at the system, cellular, and molecular levels. Modeling Biosystems A framework for modeling in BME Step one: Identify the system to be analyzed. Step two: Determine the extensive property to be accounted for. Step three: Determine the time period to be analyzed. Step four: Formulate a mathematical expression of the conservation law. Modeling Biosystems Step one: Identify the system to be analyzed SYSTEM: Any region in space or quantity of matter set side for analysis ENVIRONMENT: Everything not inside the system BOUNDARY: An infinitesimally thin surface that separates the system from its environment. Modeling Biosystems Step two: Determine the extensive property to be accounted for. An extensive property doe not have a value at a point Its value depends on the size of the system (e.g., proportional to the mass of the system) The amount of extensive property can be determined by summing the amount of extensive property for each subsystem comprising the system. The value of an extensive property for a system is a function of time (e.g., mass and volume) Conserved property: the property that can neither be created nor destroyed (e.g. charge, linear momentum, angular momentum) Mass and energy are conserved under some restrictions...
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course BUSN 1003 taught by Professor Carr,r during the Spring '08 term at Arkansas State.

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ECE602_lecture_09_04 - Modeling Biosystems Mathematical...

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