The First and second laws of Thermodynamics

The First and second laws of Thermodynamics - The First and...

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Unformatted text preview: The First and second laws of Thermodynamics The first law of thermodynamics states that states that energy is always conserved; it cannot be created or destroyed. All of the energy and matter in the universe remains constant, it only changes from one form to another. The Second Law of Thermodynamics states that "in all energy exchanges, if no energy enters or leaves the system, the potential energy of the state will always be less than that of the initial state." Once energy is used in the form of work it has to be replaced to be used again. (Hanson, 2001) In the form of a barrel of oil being burned to produce heat in the form of work to run an engine to power your car, the second law of thermodynamics states that it cannot be used twice without more minerals being added to it. The chemicals that make oil “oil” are what are burned off to produce energy. It must be replaced if you want to use it again. The Second Law of Thermodynamics tells us that energy is wasted at every step in the economic process. The engines that actually do the work in our economy waste more than 50 percent of the energy contained in their fuel in the form of heat. It is the reason when you drive your car you have to fill it up with gas after so many miles. It is a no renewable resource that cannot be used more than once. (Hanson, 2001) References Hanson, J. (2001, March 08). Energy Synopsis. Retrieved March 13, 2011, from dieoff.org: http://dieoff.org/synopsis.htm ...
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This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course BUSINESS 101 taught by Professor Wase during the Spring '11 term at Grantham.

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