Talk-Course-Waves

Talk-Course-Waves - APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Kinetic...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Kinetic models for wave propagation in random media Application to Time Reversal Guillaume Bal Department of Applied Physics & Applied Mathematics Columbia University http://www.columbia.edu/∼gb2030 gb2030@columbia.edu APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Outline 1. Time Reversal in random media and kinetic models 2. Statistical stability and rigorous theories 3. Validity of Radiative Transfer Models 4. Applications to Detection and Imaging APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Time Reversal framework p (0,x) p (0,x) t Wave Solver + Truncation χ χ Ω (x) p (T,x) Ω (x) p (T,x) t Refocusing (?) Time Reversal refoc p (0,x) refoc p t (0,x) Wave Solver χ Ω (x) p (T,x) − χ Ω(x) pt (T,x) APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerical Experiment: Initial Data APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerical Experiment: Forward Solution APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerical Experiment: Truncated Solution APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerics: Time-reversed Solution APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerics: Solution pushed forward (no TR) APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Zoom on Refocused and Original Signals Zoom on the Initial Condition Zoom on the Refocused Signal 1 0.08 0.8 pressure pressure 0.06 0.04 0.6 0.4 0.02 0.2 0 0 −0.02 0.03 0.03 0.02 0.02 0.01 0 −0.01 −0.02 −0.03 y axis −0.03 −0.02 −0.01 0 0.01 0.02 0.03 0.01 0 −0.01 −0.02 −0.03 x axis y axis −0.03 −0.02 −0.01 0 x axis 0.01 0.02 0.03 APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Time-reversal in changing 3D media We consider time reversal with possibly a change of media between the forward (ϕ = 1) and backward (ϕ = 2) stages. The forward problem for uϕ = (v, p) = (v1, v2, v3, p) is ϕ ϕ ϕ (x) ∂ u (t, x) + D j ∂ u (t, x) = 0, A ∂t ∂xj x ∈ R3 , ϕ = 1, 2, with initial condition u1(t = 0) = u0; Aϕ(x) = Diag(ρ, ρ, ρ, κϕ(x)). Using Green’s propagators Gϕ(t, x; y), the back-propagated signal is uB (x) = R9 ΓG2(T, x; y)ΓG1(T, y ; z)χΩ(y)χΩ(y )f (y − y )u0(z)dydy dz. •Γ = Diag(−1, −1, −1, 1) models the time reversal process •χΩ(y) models the array of detectors and f (y) blurring at the detectors •T is the duration of each propagation stages. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media High Frequency scaling We are interested in high frequency (O(ε−1)) wave propagation and thus wish to analyze the refocusing signal at distances O(ε) away from the source center. Rescale the problem with u0(x) = S x−x0 and accordingly with a filter ε 1 f ( y−y ). An observation point x close to x is written as x = x + εξ , 0 0 ε ε3 so that in the new variables uB (ξ ; x0) = ε R9 ΓG2(T, x0 + εξ ; y)ΓG1(T, y ; x0 + εz) ε ε y−y ×S(z)χΩ(y)χΩ(y )f ( )dydy dz. ε We thus want to understand the limiting properties (as ε → 0) of the 4 × 4-matrix G2(T, x0 + εξ ; y)ΓG1(T, y ; x0 + εz). We use kinetic models ε ε for this. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media An adjoint Green’s matrix Recall that the Green function G1(t, x; y) solves the equation 1 1 ∂G (t, x; y) + D j ∂ (G1 (t, x; y)) = 0, A ∂t ∂xj G1(0, x; y) = δ (x − y)I. Introduce the adjoint Green’s matrix G1, solution of ∗ ∂G1(t, x; y) ∂G1(t, x; y) j 1 −1 ∗ ∗ + D (A ) (x) = 0, G1(0, x; y) = δ (x−y)ΓA−1(y)Γ. ∗ ∂t ∂xj We verify the following Maxwell reciprocity-type result ΓG1(t, y; x) = G1(t, x; y)A1(x)Γ. ∗ This allows us to recast the back-propagated signal as uB (ξ ; x0) = ε R9 ΓG2(T, x0 + εξ ; y)G1∗(T, x0 + εz; y )A1(x0 + εz)Γ ε ε ε y−y ×S(z)χΩ(y)χΩ(y )f ( )dydy dz. ε APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Theory of time-reversal refocusing Introduce now the Wigner transform dz εz εz ; y)G1∗(t, x + ; y ) ε 2 2 (2π )3 R3 R6 y−y ×χΩ(y)χΩ(y )f ( )dydy , ε which satisfies the same equation as we have seen before. This allows us to write the refocused signal in terms of the Wigner transform as Wε(t, x, k) = uB (ξ ; x0) = ε R6 eik·zG2(t, x − ε ΓWε(t, x0 + ε ξ+z , k)e−ik·(z−ξ)A1(x0 + εz)ΓS(z)dzdk. ε 2 High frequency estimates of refocusing are obtained by analyzing the limit ˆ of Wε(t, x, k) as ε → 0: uB (k; x0) = ΓW0(t, x0, k)A1(x0)ΓS(k) . ˆ 0 APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Primer on Wigner Transform The Wigner transform of two vector fields is defined by: Wε[u, v](x, k) = Rd iy·ku(x − ε y )v∗ (x + ε y ) dy e 2 (2π )d 2 . It is the inverse Fourier transform of the product: y y Wε[u, v](x, k) = F −1 u(x + ε )v∗(x − ε ) . 2 2 We verify that Rd R2d W [u, v](x, k)dk = (uv∗)(x) iε kW [u, v](x, k)dk = (u v∗ − uv∗)(x) 2 Rd |k|2W [u, v](x, k)dkdx = ε2 u · v∗dx. Rd APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Equations for the Wigner transform Consider two field equations and the Wigner transform: ϕ ∂ uε + Aϕuϕ = 0, ϕ = 1, 2, ε εε ∂t Then we verify that Wε(t, x, k) = W [u1(t, ·), u2(t, ·)](x, k). ε ε ∂Wε ε + W [A1u1, u2] + W [u1, A2u2] = 0. εε ε ε εε ∂t Calculations of the type p εξ dpdξ dy − ξ ))W [u, v](y, k − ) 2 2 (2 π ) d R3d · p εq dpdq x i xεp ix·q ˆ e e V (q, p)W [u, v](x, k − − ) , W [V (x, )u, v](x, k) = ε 2 2 (2π )2d R2d ˆ W [P (x, εD)u, v](x, k) = eiy·ξ eip·(x−y) P(ξ , ik + iε( allow us to obtain an explicit equation for Wε. The above formulas are amenable to asymptotic expansions in ε. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Weak-Coupling Regime In the weak coupling regime, the random fluctuations of the media are modeled by ϕ2 2 − √εV ϕ ( x ), (cε ) (x) = c0 ϕ = 1, 2, ε c2 ϕ 1 c2 = , V ϕ(x) = 0 κ1 (x), 0 κ 0 ρ0 κ0 ϕ where c0 is the average background speed and κ1 and V ϕ are random fluctuations in the compressibility and sound speed, respectively. We assume that V ϕ(x), ϕ = 1, 2, are statistically homogeneous mean-zero random fields with correlation functions and power spectra given by: c4Rϕψ (x) = 0 ˆ (2π )dc4Rϕψ (p)δ (p + q) = 0 V ϕ(y)V ψ (y + x) , ˆ ˆ V ϕ(p)V ψ (q) . 1 ≤ ϕ, ψ ≤ 2, APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Kinetic theory in weak coupling regime The Wigner distribution at time t = 0 is given by 2 f (k)A−1 (x), where (Aϕ )−1 = A−1 + O (√ε). W (0, x, k) = |χΩ(x)| ˆ ε 0 0 The limit Wigner distribution is decomposed as: W (t, x, k) = a+(t, x, k)b+b∗ +a−(t, x, k)b−b∗ . Furthermore, the radiative − + transfer equation for a+ is (with ω+ = c0|k|) ∂a+ + c0ˆ · a+ + (Σ(k) + iΠ(k))a+ k ∂t 2 πω+(k) ˆ = R12(k − q)a+(q)δ ω+(q) − ω+(k) dq, d Rd 2(2π ) 2 ˆ ˆ πω+(k) R11 + R22 (k − q)δ ω+(q) − ω+(k) dq Σ(k) = d Rd 2(2π ) 2 iπ j =± ω (k)ω+(q) ˆ11 − R22 (k − q) j ˆ iΠ(k) = p. v . R dq. 4(2π )d ωj (q) − ω+(k) Rd APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Why is the refocusing stronger in heterogeneous media ? High frequency approximations of refocusing are given by ˆ uB (k; x0) = ΓW0(t, x0, k)A1(x0)ΓS(k) . ˆ 0 where W (t, x, k) = a+(t, x, k)b+b∗ + a−(t, x, k)b−b∗ . − + Thus, the smoother the filter, the less distorted the back-propagated signal uB . W0(t, x0, k), which solves the radiative transfer equation, is all ˆ the smoother that scattering (proportional to R12) is strong. In homogeneous media, W0(t, x0, k) is very singular and the backpropagated signal very distorted, leading to poor refocusing. When the two ˆ media are strongly correlated (so that R12 is large), W0(t, x0, k) is smooth and refocusing is enhanced. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Outline 1. Time Reversal in random media and kinetic models 2. Statistical stability and rigorous theories 3. Validity of Radiative Transfer Models 4. Applications to Detection and Imaging APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Statistical stability in Time Reversal There are few theoretical results in the weak coupling regime for the wave equation and they are concerned with ensemble averages of the Wigner transform, not its limiting law. However such limiting laws are accessible for simplifed regimes of radiative transfer, including paraxial approximations, Itˆ-Schr¨dinger approxio o mations, and random Liouville equations. Such limiting laws directly translate into results on the statistical stability of the time reversed signals whether the underlying media change or not between the two stages of the time reversal experiment. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Two models where stability can be proved • Paraxial (a.k.a. Parabolic) Approximation. Here, we obtain a (quantum) wave equation with mixing time dependent coefficients. For a typical wavelength (width of initial pulse) of order ε 1, the fluctuations are of the form √ xz εV ( , ). εε • Random Liouville Equations. Here the high frequency limit of the wave equation (Liouville equation) with random Hamiltonian is used to show that the Wigner transform solves in the limit ε → 0 a Fokker-Planck equation. For a typical wavelength of order ε 1, the fluctuations are of the form x δ (ε)V ( ), C | ln ε|−2/3+η δ (ε) → 0 as ε → 0. δ (ε) APAM APAM Waves in Random Media PART 2.1: PARAXIAL APPROXIMATION APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Analysis for the Paraxial Equation The pressure field p(z, x, t) satisfies the scalar wave equation 1 ∂ 2p − ∆p = 0. 2 (z, x) ∂t2 c (1) The parabolic approximation consists of ei(−c0κt+κz )ψ (z, x, κ)c0dκ, p(z, x, t) ≈ R where ψ satisfies the Schr¨dinger equation o ∂ψ (z, x, κ) + ∆xψ (z, x, κ) + κ2(n2(z, x) − 1)ψ (z, x, κ) = 0, ∂z ψ (z = 0, x, κ) = ψ0(x, κ) 2iκ with ∆x the transverse Laplacian in the variable x. The refraction index n(z, x) = c0/c(z, x), and c0 is a reference speed. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Cartoon of Paraxial Approximation x TIME-REVERSAL SOURCE MIRROR a L z APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Time Reversal within Paraxial Approximation The back-propagated signal can be written as ψ B (x, κ) = R3d G∗(L, x, κ; η )G(L, y, κ; y )χ(η )χ(y)f (η − y)ψ0(y , κ)dydy dη . After introduction of the Wigner Transform and scaling, we get B ψε (ξ , κ; x0) = R 2d eik·(ξ−y)Wε(L, x0 + ε y+ξ dydk , k, κ)ψ0(y, κ) . d 2 (2π ) B The above formula shows that the asymptotic behavior of ψε (ξ , κ; x0) as ε → 0 is characterized by that of the Wigner transform Wε(L, x, k, κ). APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Scaling and random medium The scaled Schr¨dinger equation is o ∂ψε 2 ∆ ψ + κ2 √εV ( x , z )ψ = 0, 2iκε +ε xε ε ∂z εε ψε(z = 0, x, κ) = ψ0(x, κ). The random field V (z, x) is a Markov process in z with infinitesimal generator Q. It is stationary in z and x with correlation function R(z, x) E {V (s, y)V (z + s, x + y)} = R(z, x) for all x, y ∈ Rd, and z, s ∈ R. The generator Q is a bounded operator on L∞(V ) with a unique invariant ˆ measure π (V ), i.e. Q∗π = 0, and there exists α > 0 such that if g , π = 0 then erQg L∞ ≤ C g L∞ e−αr . V V APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Equation for the Wigner Transform 1 ∂Wε + k · xWε = κLεWε ∂z κ 0 Wε(0, x, k; κ) = Wε (x, k; κ), z ˜ dV ( , p) 1 ip·x/ε W (x, k − p ) − W (x, k + p ) . ε LεWε = √ e ε ε i ε Rd (2π )d 2 2 The initial condition is given by 0 Wε (x, k; κ) = εy εy ei(k+q)·y ˆ χ(x − )χ(x + )f (q)dydq. d d (2π ) 2 2 R It is uniformly bounded in L2(Rd ×Rd) (hence so is Wε(z ; κ)) and converges ˆ as ε → 0 to W 0(x, k; κ) = |χ(x)|2f (k). APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Main stability result Let the array χ(y) and the filter f (y) be in L1 ∩ L∞(Rd), while ψ0 ∈ L2(Rd) for a given κ ∈ R. The refraction index n(z, x) satisfies assumptions given B above. Then for each ξ ∈ Rd the back-propagated signal ψε (ξ , x0, κ) converges in probability and weakly in L20 (Rd) as ε → 0 to the deterministic x ψ B (ξ , κ; x0) = R2d eik·(ξ−y)W (L, x0, k, κ)ψ0(y, κ) dydk . d (2π ) The function W satisfies the transport equation 1 ∂W + k · xW = κLW , ∂z κ ˆ with initial data W 0(x, k) = f (k)|χ(x)|2 and operator L defined by dp |p|2 − |k|2 ˆ Lλ = R( , p − k)(λ(p) − λ(k)), d (2π )d 2 R ˆ where R(ω, p) is the Fourier transform of the correlation function of V . APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Result on the Wigner transform Under the same assumptions, the Wigner distribution Wε converges in probability and weakly in L2(R2d) to the solution W of the above transport equation. More precisely, for any test function λ ∈ L2(R2d) the process Wε(z ), λ converges to W (z ), λ in probability as ε → 0, uniformly on finite intervals 0 ≤ z ≤ L. Here, ·, · is the usual scalar product in L2(R2d). APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Details of the proofs The scaling of the random fluctuations is supposed to be √ xz εV ( , ). εε We then have the following equation for the scaled Wε: ∂Wε + k · xWε = LεWε ∂z 0 Wε(0, x, k) = Wε (x, k), with z ˜ dV ( , p) 1 ip·x/ε W (x, k − p ) − W (x, k + p ) . ε e LεWε = √ ε ε i ε Rd (2π )d 2 2 Thanks to the blurring at the detectors, we obtain uniform bounds in L2 for the Wigner transform Wε independently of the realization of the random medium. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Construction of approximate martingales Let us define Pε as the probability measure on the space of paths C ([0, L]; X ) generated by Vε and Wε. Let λ(z, x, k) be a deterministic test function. We use the Markovian property of the random field V (z, x) in z to construct a first functional Gλ : C ([0, L]; X ) → C [0, L] by z ∂λ + k · xλ + Lλ (ζ )dζ ∂z 0 and show that it is an approximate Pε-martingale, more precisely √ EPε {Gλ[W ](z )|Fs} − Gλ[W ](s) ≤ Cλ,L ε Gλ[W ](z ) = W, λ (z ) − W, uniformly for all W ∈ C ([0, L]; X ) and 0 ≤ s < z ≤ L. Then there exists a subsequence εj → 0 so that Pεj converges weakly to a measure P supported on C ([0, L]; X ). Weak convergence of Pε and the above error estimate together imply that Gλ[W ](z ) is a P -martingale so that EP {Gλ[W ](z )|Fs} − Gλ[W ](s) = 0. Taking s = 0 above we obtain the transport equation for W = EP {W (z )} in its weak formulation. The second step is to show that for every test function λ(z, x, k) the new functional z ∂λ 2 (z ) − 2 W, λ (ζ ) W, G2,λ[W ](z ) = W, λ + k · xλ + Lλ (ζ )dζ ∂z 0 is also an approximate Pε-martingale. We then obtain that EPε W, λ 2 → W , λ 2, which implies convergence in probability. It follows that the limit measure P is unique and deterministic, and that the whole sequence Pε converges. That G2,λ[W ](z ) is an approximate Pε-martingale uses very explicitly the uniform a priori L2 bound on the Wigner distribution Wε. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media ¨ PART 2.2: ITO SCHRODINGER APPROXIMATION APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Itˆ Schr¨dinger equations o o Let us come back to the parabolic approximation ∂ψ −iLz ikLz ν Lxx Lz z + µ( , )ψ. ∆ ψ= 2x ∂z 2kLx 2 lx lz We now assume that the variations in z are very fast: lz can formally replace λ. Then we kLz ν Lxx Lz z Lxx µ( , )dz by κB ( , dz ), 2 lx lz lx where B (x, dz ) is the usual Wiener measure in z with statistics B (x, z )B (y, z ) = Q(y − x)z ∧ z . APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Itˆ Schr¨dinger equation o o The parabolic equation in this regime becomes then iLz Lxx dψ (x, z ) = ∆xψ (x, z )dz + iκψ (x, z ) ◦ B ( , dz ). 2kL2 lx x Here ◦ means that the stochastic equation is understood in the Stratonovich sense. In the Itˆ sense it becomes the Itˆ-Schr¨dinger equation: o o o 1 iLz 2 Q(0) ψ (x, z )dz + iκψ (x, z )B ( Lx x , dz ). dψ (x, z ) = ∆ −κ 2x 2 kLx lx Advantage: Closed equations for the statistical moments. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media First moment The first moment defined by m1(x, z ) = ψ (x, z ) satisfies ∂m1 1 iLz ∆ − Q(0) m1(x, z ). (x, z ) = 2x ∂z 2 kLx The L2 norm of the first moment M 2 (z ) = R |m1(x, z )|2dx d 1/2 . is given by − Q(0) z 2 M 2 (z ) = e M2(0). This shows that the coherent field m1 decays exponentially in z . This exponential decay is not related to intrinsic absorption. Instead it describes the loss of coherence caused by multiple scattering. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Second Moment (I) Energy propagation is better understood by looking at the second moment m2(x1, x2, z ) = ψ (x1, z )ψ ∗(x2, z ) . ˜ By application of the Itˆ formula we have o d(ψ (x1, z )ψ ∗(x2, z )) = ψ (x1, z )dψ ∗(x2, z ) +dψ (x1, z )ψ ∗(x2, z ) + dψ (x1, z )dψ ∗(x2, z ). This implies that iLz ∂ m2 ˜ Lx(x1 − x2) = − Q(0) m2. ˜ (∆x1 − ∆x2 )m2 + Q ˜ 2 ∂z 2kLx lx APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Second Moment (II) x1 − x2 x1 + x2 , y= . Here the Introduce the rescaled variables: x = 2 η adimensionalized wavelength ε η 1. Defining m2(x, y) = m2(x1, x2) ˜ we have ∂m2 iLz = · y m2(z ) − Q(0) − Q(y) m2(z ). 2η x ∂z kLx Introduce the Wigner transform 1 ip·y ψ (x − η y , z )ψ ∗ (x + η y , z )dy. W (x, p, z ) = e (2π )d Rd 2 2 Then m2(x, y, z ) = Rd eip·y W (x, p, z )dp and ∂W Lz ˆ + p· x W = Q(p − p ) − Q(0)δ (p − p ) W (p )dp . ∂z kL2η Rd x We thus get an equation for the limiting Wigner transform for free. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Scintillation (moment of order 4) We can similarly obtain an equation for the fourth moment: m4(x1, x2, x3, x4, z ) = ψ (x1, z )ψ ∗(x2, z )ψ (x3, z )ψ ∗(x4, z ) . ˜ We introduce the change of variables m4(x, y, z, t, z ) = m4(x1, x2, x3, x4, z ), ˜ l where x = x1+x2 , y = x1−x2 , ξ = x3+x4 , t = x3−x4 , η = Lx . We obtain 2 η 2 η x ∂m4 iLz = ( x· 2η ∂z kLx y+ ξ· t)m4(z ) − Qm4(z ), Q(x, y, ξ , t) = 2Q(0) − Q(y) − Q(t) + i j Q( i , j =± x−ξ + iy − η j t) . APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Scintillation = second moment for the WT Define W (x, p, ξ , q, z ) = W (x, p, z )W (ξ , q, z ). Its statistical average can be related to m4 and we find that ∂W Lz + (p · 2η ∂z kLx K12W = x+q· i (x−ξ)·u η Rd ˆ Q(u)e ξ ) W = R2 W + K12 W W (p − u , q − u ) + W (p + u , q + u ) 2 2 2 2 −W (p − u , q + u ) − W (p + u , q − u ) du 2 2 2 2 K2 W = ˆ ˆ Q(p − p )δ (q − q ) + Q(q − q )δ (p − p ) W (p , q )dp dq R2d R2W = K2W − 2Q(0)W . When the phase term cancels so that “|K12W| 1”, we obtain that Jη (x, p, ξ , q, z ) = W (x, p, ξ , q, z ) − W (x, p, z ) W (ξ , q, z ) , the scintillation function, is small. The energy is then statistically stable. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Smallness of the scintillation function Theorem. Let us assume that Wη (x, p, 0) is deterministic and such that R2d |Wη (x, p, 0)|2dxdp + sup |Wη (x, p, 0)|2dp ≤ C, Rd x where C is a constant independent of η . Assume also that the correlation function Q(x) ∈ L1(Rd) ∩ L∞(Rd). Then Jη 2(z ) ≤ Cη d/2, uniformly in z on compact intervals. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Weak statistical stability Theorem. Under the assumptions of the previous theorem and λ ∈ L2(R2d), we obtain that 2 ( W η , λ) − ( W η , λ) ≤ Cη d/2 λ 2. 2 Also (Wη , λ) becomes deterministic in the limit of small values of η as Cη d/2 λ 2 2→0 P ( W η , λ) − ( W η , λ) ≥ α ≤ as η → 0. α2 The Wigner transform Wη of the stochastic field ψη converges weakly and in probability to the deterministic solution W (x, p, z ) of a Radiative Transfer Equation. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Application to Time Reversal Theorem. Assume that the initial condition ψ0(y) ∈ L2(Rd), the filter f (y) ∈ L1(Rd) ∩ L2(Rd), and the detector amplification χ(x) is sufficiently B smooth. Then ψη (ξ ; x0) converges weakly and in probability to the deterministic back-propagated signal ψ B (ξ ; x0) = Rd ˆ eik·ξ W (x0, k, L)ψ0(k)dk, where W (x0, k, L) is the solution of a RTE with initial conditions W (x, k, 0) = ˆ λ f (k)|χ(x)|2. Moreover introducing λ(ξ , x0) = ˜(x0)µ(ξ ) we have the following estimate B B (ψη − ψη , λ)2 ≤ Cη d ψ0 2 λ 2 = Cη d ψ0 2 µ 2 ˜ 2, 2λ2 2 2 2 uniformly in L on compact intervals. We do not have such an estimate for the parabolic approximation. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Scintillation may appear and not disappear Theorem. Assume that Wη (x, p, 0) = δ (x − x0)δ (p − p0) [not physical in Time Reversal]. Then the scintillation function Jη is composed of a singular term of the form (with Q = Q(0)): δ (x − ξ )δ (p − q) α(x, p, z ) − e−2Qz α(x − z p, p, 0) plus other contributions that are mutually singular with respect to this term. Moreover the density α(x, p, z ) solves the radiative transfer equation with initial condition a0(x, p) = δ (x − x0)δ (p − p0): ∂α +p· ∂z xα + 2Qα = Rd ˆ Q(u) α(x, p + u u , z ) + α(x, p − , z ) du. 2 2 The total intensity of this scintillation is (1 − e−2Qz ) (so it grows in z though it vanishes at z = 0). In this case Energy is NOT statistically stable. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media PART 2.3: RANDOM LIOUVILLE REGIME APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Stability by Random Liouville Let us come back to the full wave equation and introduce vε(t, x) = 1/2 Aε (x)uε(t, x) that satisfies the symmetrized system ∂ vε −1/2 −1/2 j∂ (x)D + Aε (x)vε(x) = 0. Aε j ∂t ∂x Define Pε(x, k) = P0(x, k) + εP1(x), where 1 −1 2 (x)D j A− 2 (x)k = ic (x)k D j P0(x, k) = iAε ε ε j j 1 1 1 ∂ −2 −2 −2 j∂ 2P1(x) = Aε (x)D Aε (x) − Aε (x) ∂xj ∂xj 1 j A− 2 (x). Dε The Wigner transform Wε(t, x, k) satisfies the evolution equation ∂Wε + LεWε = 0 ∂t iφf (z, p) − f (z, p)e−iφP (y, q) dzdpdydq , Lεf (x, k) = Pε(y, q)e ε (πε)2d φ(x, z, k, p, y, q) = 2 ((p − k) · y + (q − p) · x + (k − q) · z). ε ε APAM APAM Waves in Random Media The Liouville equations The self-adjoint matrix −iP0 has eigenvalues λ0 = 0 of multiplicity d − 1 and λε ,2(x, k) = ±cε(x)|k| and can be diagonalized as 1 2 2 λε (x, k)Πq (x, k), q −iP0(x, k) = Πq (x, k) = I. where q =0 q =0 The Liouville approximation to the Wigner transform is given by Uε(t, x, k) = q uε (t, x, k)Πq (k), q where the coefficients uε solve the Liouville equation q ∂uε q + ε kλq · ε x uq − ε xλq · ∂t uε (0, x, k) = TrΠq W0(x, k)Πq q ε k uq = 0 Here, the coefficients λε depend on δ (ε) and W0 is chosen independent q of ε. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Approximation of Wε by Liouville equation √ √ x x Theorem. Let ρε(x) = ρ0 + δρ1( ) and κε(x) = κ0 + δκ1( ), with all δ δ terms sufficiently smooth. Then we have ε Ct 0 Wε(t, x, k) − Uε(t, x, k) 2 ≤ C m exp( 3/2 ) W0 H 3 + Wε − W0 L2 , δ δ for some m independent of ε. 0 In other words, assuming that Wε converges strongly to W0 and that δ (ε) → 0 as ε → 0 with the constraint δ (ε) | ln ε|−2/3+η , then the difference Wε(t, x, k) − Uε(t, x, k) L2 → 0 uniformly on final intervals t ∈ (0, T ). The convergence is uniform in the realization of the random medium (the statistics of ρ1 and κ1 have not been defined yet). So we safely replace the analysis of Wε by that of Uε, the solution of a Liouville equation with random coefficients. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Analysis of the random Liouville equation The Liouville equation is of the form √ ∂uε xˆ + c0 + δc1( ) k · ∂t δ uε(0, x, k) = u0(x, k). |k| x uε − √ δ x x c1 ( ) · δ k uε = 0 , Its solution is given by uε(t, x, k) = u0(X(t), K(t)), where √ dX X(t) ˆ − = c0 + δc1( ) K, dt δ X(t) |K(t)| dK − =− √ ), x c1 ( dt δ δ X(0) = x, K(0) = k. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Decorrelation of nearby particles Let us assume that two particles satisfy the system for j = 1, 2, (δ ) dXj (t) = dt c0 + (δ ) dKj (t) 1 =√ dt δ √ ( Xj δ )(t) ˆ (δ ) δc1( δ ) Kj (t), ( Xj δ )(t) (δ ) )|Kj (t)|, x c1 ( δ X(δ )(0) = xj j K(δ )(0) = kj . j Under suitable mixing conditions for c1 and for k1 = k2, the laws of the (δ ) (δ ) (δ ) (δ ) processes (K1 , X1 , K2 , X2 ) converge weakly as δ → 0 to the law of t ˆ (K1, X1, K2, X2), where Xj (t) = xj + c0 Kj (s)ds, j = 1, 2, and where 0 kj (·), j = 1, 2 are independent symmetric diusions in Rd \ {0} starting at kj , j = 1, 2 correspondingly with common generator d LF (k) = p,q =1 |k|2Dp,q (ˆ)∂kp,kq F (k) + k2 d |k|Ep(ˆ)∂kp F (k). k p=1 APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Stability of the Wigner Transform We deduce from the previous result that E{uε(t, x, k)} → F (t, x, k) weakly as δ (ε) → 0, where F satisfies the following Fokker-Planck equation ∂F + c0ˆ · xF − LF = 0. k ∂t Moreover, we obtain the stability result E uε(T, x0, k) − F (T, x0, k), λ(k) 2 dx0 → 0 as δ (ε) → 0, which implies that uε converges in probability to the deterministic solution F . This in turn implies the stability of the refocused signal uB . APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Summary of radiative transfer models We have obtained several transport models of the form ∂a + c0 ˆ · x a + S a = 0 , k ∂t where the scattering operator S is given respectively by Radiative Transfer: S a = Rd ˆ R(p − k)(a(k) − a(p))δ c0|p| − c0|k| dk |p |2 − | k |2 ˆ , p − k )(a(k ) − a(p ))dk R( d−1 2 R Paraxial: Sa = Itˆ-Schr¨dinger: o o Sa = Fokker-Planck: S a = −D(|k|)∆ˆa. k ˆ R(0, p − k )(a(k ) − a(p ))dk Rd−1 Note that Radiative Transfer and Fokker-Planck admit a diffusion limit for small mean free paths. This can be arranged for the paraxial approxˆ ˆ imation when R(t, ·) ≈ δ (t)R (·), but not for Itˆ-Schr¨dinger. o o APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Summary of Kinetic models for Time Reversal • We have a theory to express the high frequency limit of the refocused signal in Time Reversal experiments using a Wigner transform. In the scalar case, this expression is ˆ uB (p; x0) = W (T, x0, p)S (p; x0). ˆ The filter can also be generalized to changing environments. • In certain cases, we can rigorously characterize the high frequency limit of the Wigner transform and if possible (and true) obtain its stability. This has been done for the parabolic approximation and the Itˆ o Schr¨dinger approximation, and in the random Liouville regime, where o high frequency waves are approximated by particles propagating in random media. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Outline 1. Time Reversal in random media and kinetic models 2. Statistical stability and rigorous theories 3. Validity of Radiative Transfer Models 4. Applications to Detection and Imaging APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Time reversal in changing media Consider two media with compressibility fluctuations given by ˆ2(x, k) = κ φ(x)eiτ ·kˆ1(x, k). For instance φ(x) corresponds to a change in the amκ plitude of the fluctuations at the macroscopic scale x and τ corresponds to a spatial shift in the domain before back-propagation. In the diffusive regime, the back-propagated signal takes the form κ0 ˆ cos(ΠsT )iˆ k sin(ΠsT ) ik uB (k; x0) = ˆ ˆ ˆ ρ p0(k) + − sin(Π T ) ρ |k|ϕ(k) s κ0 cos(ΠsT ) −iτ ·k sin |τ ||k| e−Σψ 2 T /2 a(T, x , |k|). ×e 0 |τ ||k| This is to be compared to the case where Πs = ψ = |τ | = 0 when the medium remains the same during the forward and backward propagations. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media 2D Numerical simulations In two space dimensions and in the case of periodic media with large distances of propagation relative to the size of the box, the filter is asymptotically given by − Σ ψ2T 2 F (ψ, |τ |, |k|, T, L, kmax, κ) = ¯ J0(|τ ||k|) cos(2ψ Π0T ) e a . It should be compared to the numerical simulation (pB (x + τ ), p0(x)) Fdata = . 2 p0(x) We consider some simulations with varying |τ | (shifting medium). APAM APAM Waves in Random Media 2D Numerical simulations (II) Comparison of Fdata (solid lines) and the theoretical prediction F (dashed lines) as a function of τ with ψ = 0. Periodic box of size L = 20, propagation time T = 200, number of modes in power spectrum: 50. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Duke experimental setting APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Spatial shift before backpropagation APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Back-propagated signal Back-propgated signal as a function of spatial shift for several frequencies. The minimum of the back-propagated signal exactly occurs where it is predicted by the two-dimensional theory. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Numerical validation of radiative transfer Wave propagation in heterogeneous media may sometimes be difficult to control in real experiments. Numerical simulations offer an interesting complement to physical experiments. In order to be relevant the simulations need to consider spatial domains that are much larger than the typical wavelength in the system. This requires us to use multi-processor architectures and parallelized codes. We have developed such a computational tool to solve acoustic waves (easily extendible to micro-waves) in the time domain. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Details of the wave (microscopic) code. The codes solves a discrete version (centered second-order discretization in space and time) of the following acoustic wave system of equation ∂v + ρ−1(x) p = 0, ∂t ∂p + κ−1(x) · v = 0. ∂t The domain is surrounded by a perfectly matched layer (PML) method so that outgoing waves are not reflected at the domain boundary. The (random) physical coefficients ρ(x) and κ(x) are carefully chosen to verify prescribed statistical properties. The FDFT (Finite difference forward in time) method has been parallelized by using the software PETSc developed at Argonne. Forward calculations for T = 1500 (typical times necessary to validate the diffusive model; for λ = 1 and average sound speed c0 = 1) require 3-4 days of calculations. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Details of the macroscopic codes. In both the direct and time reversal measurements, the data are the macroscopic energy densities 1 E (t, x) = ρ(x)|v|2(t, x) + κ(x)p2(t, x) . 2 We consider two macroscopic models for E : a radiative transfer equation and a diffusion equation. The radiative transfer equation is solved by a Monte Carlo method (requiring in excess of 50M particles to achieve a reasonable accuracy even with good variance reduction technique conditioning particles on hitting the inclusion). The diffusion equation is solved by the finite element method. The domain size is roughly 20, 000 × 10, 000 = 200M nodes ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¡¢¢¡¢¢¡¢¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢¢¢¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢¢¢ ¢ ¢¢ ¢¢¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¢ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¡¡ ¡¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡¡ ¢¢¡¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡ ¢¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¢ ¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¢ ¡¡¡¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¡ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¢¢ ¡¡¡¡¢¢ ¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¡¡ ¡¡¡¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢¢¢¢¢ ¢¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¢¢¢ ¢ ¢¢ ¢¢¢ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡¢¡ ¡ ¡ ¡¢ ¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¡¢¡¢¡¢¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢¡ ¢¡¡¡¡¡ ¢¡¡ ¢¡¡¡ ¢¡¡¡¡ ¢ ¢ ¢ ¢ PML 600 Detector P M 300 75 L Inclusion (450,150) R= 50 ,40, 30, 20,10 P M L 150 Source (150,150) PML medium fluctuations 5−8% 20 points per wavelength λ=1 A typical configuration for the wave solver APAM APAM Waves in Random Media APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Wave-Transport-diffusion comparison Experiment with isotropic ˆ scattering (R ≡ 1 for this frequency; the source term is a localized Bessel function). The best transport fit is obtained for Σ−1 = 88.5 versus num Σ−1 = 83.00. The best fit for th the diffusion coefficient and the extrapolation length are Dnum = 43.2 and Lex = 0.80 versus Dth = (2Σ)−1 = 41.5 and Lth = 0.81. Averaged energy densities on detector as a function of time. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Effect of void inclusion Correction (w.r.t. solution without inclusion) generated by a void inclusion, where the random fluctuations are suppressed. Left, radius of 40. Right, radius of 50. Transport and diffusion generated by best energy fit. The diffusion fit is valid only for very long times, whereas transport performs extremely well. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Effect of increased randomness Correction generated by an inclusion of radius R = 50 where the random fluctuations are suppressed. Left: 5% RMS. Right: 8% RMS. Transport and diffusion generated by best energy fit. The diffusion fit is now much more accurate. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Effect of perfectly reflecting inclusion Correction generated by a perfectly reflecting inclusion (specular reflection for transport and Neumann conditions for diffusion). Left, radius of 30. Right, radius of 40. Transport and diffusion generated by best energy fit. Still very good agreement between wave and transport simulations. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Effect of a (4 times) smaller detector −5 x 10 −4 Corrections, R=40, small detector 0 x 10 Corrections, R=30, small detector Detector Correction Detector Correction 10 Wave transport Σ−1=88.5 8 6 −1 4 2 0 Wave transport Σ−1=88.5 −2 0 1000 Time 2000 3000 0 1000 Time 2000 3000 Comparison of wave and transport predictions. Isotropic medium with 5% RMS. Left: void inclusion with R = 40; Right: reflecting inclusion with R = 30. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Effect of a smaller inclusion −5 x 10 Corrections, R=20, isotropic case −4 0 8 Detector Correction Detector Correction 10 Wave transport Σ−1=88.5 6 4 2 0 1000 Time 2000 3000 x 10 Corrections, R=10, isotropic case −1 Wave transport Σ−1=88.5 −2 0 1000 Time 2000 3000 Comparison of wave and transport predictions with large detector. Isotropic medium with 5% RMS. Left: void inclusion with R = 20; Right: reflecting inclusion with R = 10. Conclusion: Radiative transfer is statistically stable when sufficient averaging takes place. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Outline 1. Time Reversal in random media and kinetic models 2. Statistical stability and rigorous theories 3. Validity of Radiative Transfer Models 4. Applications to Detection and Imaging APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Experimental setting; forward stage APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Experimental setting; backward stage APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Modeling the inclusion The detection and imaging of buried inclusions (which are large compared to the wavelength) is done as follows. We model the inclusion as a variation in the kinetic parameters of the radiative transfer equation that models the wave energy density. The objective is to reconstruct these kinetic parameters from wave energy measurements at the boundary of a domain. This is severely ill-posed problem (in the sense that the reconstruction amplifies noise drastically). Because the inclusion is assumed to be of small volume (at the macroscopic scale), further assumptions are possible. We consider asymptotics in the volume of the inclusion, which take the form δa0(t, x, k) = −|B | t 0 G(t − s, x, xb, k) (Qa0)(s, xb, k)ds + l.o.t., where a0 is the unperturbed solution, G the transport Green’s function, Q the scattering operator and |B | ∼ Rd the inclusion’s volume. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Reconstruction of the inclusion Detection and imaging based on the above asymptotic expansions allow us obtain the inclusion’s location and volume: σn/a0 0.25% 0.5% 1% error on R (%) 12 25 33 error on xb 9.0 15 30 error on yb 3.5 5.0 10 Very accurate data are required to locate and estimate the inclusion. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media TR in Changing media; forward stage APAM APAM Waves in Random Media TR in changing media; backward stage APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Imaging and changing media In the diffusive regime, the perturbation caused by a void inclusion is given approximately by δuD (t, x) = dπD0Rd t 0 xu0(t − s, xb) · xb G(s, x, xb)ds. Here d is dimension and G(s, x, xb) the background Green’s function. When we have access to the measured wave field both in the presence and in the absence of the inclusion, we can consider the correlation of the two fields. In the diffusive regime, the corresponding perturbation is given by t δu(t, x) = −4π R u0(t − s, xb)G(s, x, xb)ds + o(R), 0 t 2π 1 ), δu(t, x) = u0(t − s, xb)G(s, x, xb)ds + o( ln R 0 | ln R| d=3 d = 2. Since O(R) O(R3 ) in d = 3 and O(| ln R|−1 ) O(R2 ) in d = 2, it is much easier to detect and image in the presence of differential information. APAM APAM Waves in Random Media Can time-reversal experiments help? Direct energy and time reversal measurements are hampered by two types of noise: background noise ne and model noise nm (characterizing the accuracy of the diffusive model). Let U be the direct measurement and F the TR filter measurement. Then we have that (after a few simplifications) ˜ δ U = δU + nmU0 + nd ˜ δ F = δF + nmF0 + εd/2nd; (d is dimension). Thus both types of measurements are equally affected by the model noise. However, because background noise does not refocus at the source location, it is strongly attenuated in the TR experiment. In practice, direct measurements are very faint and thus even very small background noise renders the detection impossible. This is where time reversal helps (and may justify its equipment cost). APAM APAM Waves in Random Media References • G.Bal, G. Papanicolaou and L.Ryzhik. Self-averaging in time reversal for the parabolic wave equation. Stoch. Dyn., 2 (2002) 507–532 • G.Bal, T.Komorowski and L.Ryzhik, Self-averaging of Wigner transforms in random media. Comm. Math. Phys., 242 (2003) 81–135 • G.Bal and L.Ryzhik, Time Reversal and Refocusing in Random Media, SIAM J. Appl. Math. 63(5) (2003) 1475-1498 • G.Bal. On the self-averaging of wave energy in random media. Multiscale Model. Simul., 2(3), (2004) 398-420, 2004 • G.Bal and R.Ver´stegui, Time Reversal in Changing Environment, Multiscale Model. a Simul., 2(4) (2004) 639-661 • G.Bal and O.Pinaud, Time Reversal Based Detection in Random Media, Inverse Problems, 21(5) (2005) 1593-1620 • G.Bal and O.Pinaud, Accuracy of transport models for acoustic waves in random media, submitted ...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 08/30/2011 for the course APMA 6901 taught by Professor Bal during the Fall '08 term at Columbia.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online