file4 - T he IMF offers its member countries a broad range...

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Unformatted text preview: T he IMF offers its member countries a broad range of technical assistance and training in macroeconomic management covering fiscal, monetary, statistical, and legal areas. In the field, it provides this assistance through missions by IMF staff from various depart- ments, supplemented by hired consultants and experts. The work is complemented by headquarters support. Training courses and seminars are conducted by the IMF Institute and other departments, both at head- quarters and overseas. A Technical Assistance Commit- teecomposed of senior staff from each of the IMFs departments and assisted by a Technical Assistance Secretariatadvises IMF management on priorities and policies and coordinates assistance activities within the IMF. Technical assistance continued at a high pace in FY2000, with demands placed on the IMF as part of the international effort to strengthen the global finan- cial architecture. The Board conducted a major review of technical assistance in June 1999 and published an IMF Policy Statement on Technical Assistance in March 2000. Developments in FY2000 Technical assistance to members remained a major part of the IMFs work in FY2000, accounting for about 19 percent of total IMF administrative spending. Staff and experts supplied more than 300 person-years of services (see Table 7.1), comparable to the annual average for the past five years and more than double that of the late 1980s and early 1990s. The regional distribution of IMF technical assistance in FY2000 was similar to that in the previous year, except that the share for Asia and Pacific area countries was lower as their demand eased with the resolution of the Asian financial crisis. Technical assistance was equally allo- cated between the fiscal and monetary areas, which together accounted for about 70 percent of total assis- tance (see Figure 7.1). In addition to its own budgeted resources for tech- nical assistance and training, the IMF administers financing provided by several bilateral and multilateral donorsincluding Australia, Denmark, France, Switzerland, Japan, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, as well as the Asian Development Bank, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP), and the World Bankeither through the Framework Administered Account for Technical Assistance (estab- lished by the IMF in 1995), or through cost sharing under UNDP projects executed by the IMF or other arrangements with the IMF. Some donorssuch as Norway, Sweden, the United Kingdom, the Inter- American Development Bank, and the European Unionhave also coordinated technical assistance cofi- nancing arrangements with the IMF. In FY2000, exter- nal financing accounted for about 30 percent of the IMFs total technical assistance and training activities, with Japan continuing to be the largest source of such external financing. The Technical Assistance Secretariat coordinates the management of this financing....
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file4 - T he IMF offers its member countries a broad range...

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