Reflective PPR (psy 202)

Reflective PPR (psy 202) - Turning 1 Turning My Struggles...

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Turning 1 Turning My Struggles Into Strengths Jennifer Baxter Psychology 202 Shannon Geary February 9, 2009
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Turning 2 Turning My Struggles Into Strengths Growing up, I was part of a family who continually struggled, not only financially but emotionally as well. My childhood was laced with traumatic emotional experiences that scarred not only the remainder of my childhood, but my adulthood as well. I always knew I would struggle with these instabilities; I never thought, however, that I would learn about and understand the deeper meaning of these behaviors and ultimately, decide how they would affect my future. Based on multiple developmental theories I have learned about, as well as my willingness to overcome, I have learned how to turn daunting instabilities coupled with only slight positive influence into more stable behaviors. In addition, I have learned how to create the tools that enable me to be a positive role model for my own children and create the future I desire. I grew up with a single mother who continually struggled to keep ends met. I am the middle child sandwiched between a younger sister and older brother, both of which outwardly dealt with the struggles similarly as I did. The three of us are only 18 months apart, so the three of us shared the same experiences throughout our childhood; the changes the three of us endured were group-specific. After bi-weekly weekend visits and two-month long summer visits for 10 years, my father abruptly cut off all contact with us, leaving me not only confused and deeply hurt, but also struggling to realize who I was and who I would become without his presence in my life. By Erikson’s psychosocial theory of stages (cited in Boyd & Bee, 2006), I was already struggling with identity versus role confusion at this age; the outcome of this life experience, whether it was
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Turning 3 negative or positive, would directly affect the shape my personality took (pg 27). I do have positive memories of summers at my father’s, but they are undoubtedly clouded by all the negativism us children experienced at the same time. For instance, during the school year, I visited my father every other weekend. For the most part, all I can remember of those visits is my mother and father fighting whenever my brother, sister, and I were being picked up on Friday and dropped off on Sunday. My parents would constantly bicker with each other in front of us, and then bad-mouth each other when we were in the car. I can remember one experience when my mother came to pick us up at my father’s; she was standing on the doorstep waiting for us to gather our things when my father told my mother to wait in the car. Of course, my mother was defiant because she wasn’t going to
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This note was uploaded on 08/29/2011 for the course BUSINESS 101 taught by Professor All during the Spring '11 term at Ashford University.

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Reflective PPR (psy 202) - Turning 1 Turning My Struggles...

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