Special Senses-2011-3.0

Special Senses-2011-3.0 - Ren M. Lisjak Ph. D. Candidate...

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Unformatted text preview: Ren M. Lisjak Ph. D. Candidate Department of Anthropology University at Buffalo **Based on lectures by Joyce E. Sirianni, PhD** Transduction ??  The animal is able to react to the stimulus (motor response, memory, emotion, etc.) Smell/Olfaction  Taste/Gustation  Hearing  Equilibrium  Vision Touch (pain, pressure & temp) is considered a somatic sense Gustatory/Taste Deep Auditory area Olfactory bulb, tract and cortex are not visible in the image above Thalamus CN I Nerve fibers, the tract and bulb are considered projections of the brain  Olfactory cortex: paleocortex phylogenetically old part of the cerebrum  Interacts with limbic system (emotion, memory, visceral responses)  Is the only sense that relays directly to the cerebrum Smell and taste are senses of chemoreception  Both require the sample(odorant/food) to be dissolved in order for the receptor(s) to process the stimulus  Moisture rich olfactory epithelium and oral mucosa http://www.neuro.fsu.edu/~mmered/vomer/snake.htm Pheromone reception: Sensory neurons travel to olfactory cortex - directly to limbic system bypassing consciousness Well developed in reptiles (snakes)  Direct communication between the mouth and nasal passage (in reptiles)  Predation and defense, ???  Pheromone reception in mammals (prosimians, some NWM, NOT in OWM??)  Humans and chimps: vestigial cluster of receptors in pit on the nasal septum Nolte, 2002 Encephalization  Higher primates decreased reliance on smell  Increased reliance on vision and tactile touch  Result: reduction of the snout/muzzle Basic taxonomic differences between primates  New World Monkeys: Platyrrhines (e.g., Cebus, Ateles) -Flat-nosed - Interconnecting passage  Old World Monkey: Catarrhines: (e.g., Macaca, Cercopithecines) -Downward-nosed -Nostrils and internal structures are close together -Septum continuous (human and apes) Platyrrhines/New World Monkeys Cebus: Capuchin Ateles: Spider Monkey Catarrhine/ Old World Monkey Nose Macaca Papio Cercopithecus Present in most mammals  Most prosimians (not present in Tarsier)  Glandular tissue is an extension of the olfactory...
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course APY 345/346 taught by Professor Siriani during the Spring '11 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Special Senses-2011-3.0 - Ren M. Lisjak Ph. D. Candidate...

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