1_Follow_the_corn_2011

1_Follow_the_corn_2011 - Unit I Starting with the stomach...

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Unit I Starting with the stomach: Everyday environmental ethics
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Food ethics as environmental ethics Food: basic link between “nature” and “culture” Food web “The American agro-industrial complex”
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Historicizing food webs American agro-industrial complex is relatively recent (> WWII)
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“… the way we eat represents our most profound engagement with the natural world. Daily, our eating turns nature into culture, transforming the body of the world into our bodies and minds. Agriculture has done more to reshape the natural world than anything else we humans do, both its landscapes and the composition of its flora and fauna. Our eating also constitutes a relationship with dozens of other species – plants, animals, and fungi – with which we have coevolved to the point where our fates are deeply entwined… Eating puts us in touch with all that we share with the other animals, and all that sets us apart. It defines us.” - Michael Pollan, The Omnivore’s Dilemma (p. 10)
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Follow the corn: The American agro-industrial complex www.nataliedee.com/012106/corn.jpg
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Sources and additional readings Daniel Charles, Lords of the Harvest: Biotech, Big Money, and the Future of Food (Cambridge, MA: Perseus Publishing, 2001). William Cronon, Nature’s Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West (NY: W.W. Norton, 1991). Deborah Fitzgerald, The Business of Breeding: Hybrid Corn in Illinois, 1890 – 1940 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1990).
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