Abstract-Shale Oil

Abstract-Shale Oil - A Technical Brief Concerning Shale Oil...

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A Technical Brief Concerning Shale Oil Development and Exploration Submitted to: Dr. Miguel Bagajewicz University of Oklahoma Department of Chemical Engineering Prepared by Justin Brady Laura Kerr Mike Potts May 3, 2006
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Executive Summary Shale oil is seen by many as America’s answer to dependence on importing foreign oil. Shale oil deposits in the western United States are estimated as containing 2 trillion barrels of recoverable oil in the form of kerogen, a precursor to common petroleum and natural gas. Through earth’s natural heating and pressurizing, kerogen eventually forms oil and natural gas which are today’s main energy source. Over the last hundred years there have been several methods devised to extract petroleum from kerogen, but none have been efficient or economical enough to pursue. However, Shell has been researching a new method of production for several years called the in-situ conversion process that looks promising for the future of shale oil production. Shale oil has had a long history in the United States. The federal government first
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course CHE 4273 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Oklahoma State.

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Abstract-Shale Oil - A Technical Brief Concerning Shale Oil...

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