Hydrogen Generation-Abstract

Hydrogen Generation-Abstract - Nick Anderson John Coppock...

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Nick Anderson John Coppock Paul R. Gerber Claudio Ramos H H H y y y d d d r r r o o o g g g e e e n n n G G G e e e n n n e e e r r r a a a t t t i i i o o o n n n A A A n n n a a a l l l y y y z z z i i i n n n g g g t t t h h h e e e v v v i i i a a a b b b i i i l l l i i i t t t y y y o o o f f H H H y y y d d d r r r o o o g g g e e e n n n a a a s s s a a a m m m o o o b b b i i i l l l e e e e e e n n n e e e r r r g g g y y y c c c a a a r r r r r r i i i e e e r r r Spring 2005
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Hydrogen Generation Page 2 of 3 Executive Summary In many scientific circles, the discussion of Hydrogen production for the storage and transportation of energy is a main topic. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are a limited resource and are mass polluters with carbon dioxide emission from their combustion holding the main responsibility for global warming. As fossil fuel supplies decrease and oil prices increase, the transportation industry will
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This note was uploaded on 08/31/2011 for the course CHE 4273 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '10 term at Oklahoma State.

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Hydrogen Generation-Abstract - Nick Anderson John Coppock...

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