Municipal Solid Waste Processing-Business Plan

Municipal Solid Waste Processing-Business Plan - Business...

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Business Plan: New York Municipal Solid Waste Capstone Design Project- University of Oklahoma Spring 2003 By: Jessica Beard Brant Bennett Jason Black Adam Bymaster Alex Ibanez
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3 Table of Contents I. MSW in New York City. ............................................................................................................ 4 II. Pyrolysis Process Overview. .................................................................................................... 5 III. End Product Comparison. ..................................................................................................... 10 IV. Hydrogen Processing Plant. ................................................................................................... 11 V. Transportation. ........................................................................................................................ 12 VI. The Mathematical Model: Formulating a Business Plan. ..................................................... 12 VII. Conclusions . ......................................................................................................................... 19
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4 Business Plan: New York Municipal Solid Waste By: Jessica Beard, Brant Bennett, Jason Black, Adam Bymaster, Alex Ibanez Capstone Design Project- University of Oklahoma - Spring 2003 In 2001, the United States generated 208.4 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), or 5 pounds per person per day. 1 By weight, 15% is burnt, 30 % is recycled and 55 % is put into landfills. 2 Municipal solid waste consists of product packaging, grass clippings, furniture, clothing, bottles, food scraps, newspapers, appliances and batteries. Materials such as construction demolition debris, municipal liquid waste (MLW) treatment sludges and non- hazardous industrial wastes are not considered MSW. 2 Institutional wastes, such as waste products from prisons, hospitals, and schools are considered MSW. Several cities facing disposal problems were considered for a new disposal method of municipal solid waste. The decision was made based on: current disposal costs, trends in disposal costs, trends in waste production, population growth and the severity of the problem with current method of disposal. The four locations analyzed were New York City, New York; Los Angeles, California; Detroit, Michigan; and Hilo, Hawaii. Although each location has significant problems processing municipal solid waste, New York City was selected based on the aforementioned criteria. It produces the largest amount of MSW per day, pays a high cost to dispose of its MSW, and it maintains a large population growth. I. MSW in New York City Everyday New York City and its surrounding area generate approximately 47,303 tons of waste. The New York Department of Sanitation (DOS) manages 40% of this waste, and private corporations handle the other 60%. In the year 2000, 35% of the amount that the DOS managed was recycled, 34% was deposited at the Fresh Kills Landfill, and 31% was exported out of the city. However, the Fresh Kills Landfill closed in April of 2001. On average, New York City pays an average $63.30 per ton to landfill their municipal solid waste 3 . Present Methods of Disposal In New York City, approximately 10,500 tons of MSW need processing daily 4 . As previously mentioned, the amount not recycled is transported out of the city to several neighboring landfills. However, landfilling is a decreasing option for several reasons. In a high density area such as New York City, health problems stemming from landfill contamination have prompted the passage of state laws that prevent landfilling in the municipal area 5 . The laws have long since placed a constraint on MSW disposal in the vicinity of New York City, particularly the state of New York.
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Municipal Solid Waste Processing-Business Plan - Business...

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