Chapt 6 Notes - CHAPTER 6 IONIC BONDS AND SOME MAIN GROUP...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
69 CHAPTER 6 IONIC BONDS AND SOME MAIN–GROUP CHEMISTRY Chapter Learning Goals A. Formation of Ions 1. Predict the ground–state electron configuration for ions. 2. Given a set of ions, determine which ion is expected to have the largest radius. B. Ionization Energies and Electron Affinities 1. For any two elements predict which has the higher first ionization energy. 2. For any two elements, predict which has the higher second, third, fourth, etc. ionization energy. 3. For any two elements, predict which has the more negative first electron affinity. C. Ionic Solids and Lattice Energies 1. Identify the energies involved in a Born–Haber calculation of lattice energy. Know whether these energies are positive or negative, large or small, and use the Born–Haber cycle to calculate the lattice energy of an ionic compound. 2. On the basis of ionic charges and ionic radii, predict which of two ionic compounds should have the greater lattice energy. D. Main–Group Chemistry: Oxidation–Reduction Reactions 1. Know which alkali and alkaline earth metals form a) oxides, b) peroxides, and c) superoxides upon reaction with oxygen. Assign oxidation numbers to the oxygen atoms in these compounds. 2. Give the formulas of products formed when alkali metals react with halogens, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, water, or ammonia. Balance the equations. 3. Give the formulas of products formed when alkaline earth metals react with halogens, hydrogen, oxygen, or water. Balance the equations. 4. Give the formulas of products formed when aluminum reacts with halogens, nitrogen, oxygen, acids, or bases. Balance the equations. 5. Give the formulas of products formed when halogens react with metals, hydrogen, or other halogens. 6. Balance redox equations representing reactions studied in this chapter. Identify which species are oxidized and which are reduced and which elements have undergone a change in oxidation state. E. Octet Rule 1. Use the octet rule to generalize the chemistry of each family of elements studied in this chapter. Know when to expect the octet rule to be valid and when it can fail. 2. Give the noble gas configuration of cations and anions in ionic compounds. Chapter in Brief Chemical bonds are the forces that hold atoms together. There are two types: ionic bonds and covalent bonds. This chapter concentrates on the reasons ionic bonds are formed and the energies involved in the formation of these bonds. You will learn that the underlying reason for the formation of ions and ionic compounds is the valence shell configuration of the elements, which determines the amount of energy needed for losing or gaining electrons. Knowing the periodic trends in the energies for ion formation, you will learn how to predict which elements form cations or anions and if the formation of ionic compounds is energetically favorable. You will also learn about the Born Haber cycle, a series of hypothetical steps used to calculate the overall energy involved in the formation of ionic compounds.
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 09/01/2011 for the course BUSINESS 101 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '11 term at Southern Nazarene.

Page1 / 15

Chapt 6 Notes - CHAPTER 6 IONIC BONDS AND SOME MAIN GROUP...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online