Position Paper II, Cross Border Trucking

Position Paper II, Cross Border Trucking - In the Matter of...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
In the Matter of Cross Border Trucking under NAFTA By Garrett Barnes on March 28, 2010
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
There are many ways to travel goods to America from many different countries. The main ways of travel would be Airplanes, railroads, and trucks. I am going to be talking about cross border trucking from U.S. and Mexico. Cross Border trucking has been going on for as long as trucks have been invented. Trucking is the one of the most efficient ways to get goods from one destination to another. It has been around for many years and will still be around for many years to come. With the size and powerfulness of trucks, they can haul up to 59,000 lbs of goods on one truck. This is why the truck has become so popular and in high demand when talking about crossing the border with goods. The history of cross border trucking, with the US and Mexico, has been going on since December 18, 1995, when US did not allow trucks to enter the country because of driving restrictions and safety regulations on Mexico. Also, according to Kenneth R. DeJarnette, specialist in transportation, there was also evidence of Mexican trucks bringing illegal drugs into the US. Ever since this encounter in 1995, Mexico has not been able to move goods into the US. Mexico in return, files a case against the US under Chapter 20 of NAFTA in 1998. After three years of debate, the NAFTA settlement dispute panel determined in 2001 that the US was in violation of their rights on cross border trucking and that Mexico has the right, under NAFTA article 2019, to “impose countervailing duties equivalent to the value loss in trade.” This ruling stated that the US could be charged 1-2 billion dollars a year for every year it refuses to allow cross border trucking. Because of our good efforts to resolve the issue, the Mexican government did not impose these measures. According to NAFTA of Article 1202 (which states: Each party shall accord to
Background image of page 2
service providers of another party treatment no less favorable than it accords, in like circumstances, to its own service providers) requires that differential treatment should be no greater that necessary for legitimate regulatory reasons such as safety. The US claims that Mexico does not even allege that there is any interest on behalf of Mexican nationals to invest in US trucking firms. The prohibition on allowing Mexican investors to acquire
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 7

Position Paper II, Cross Border Trucking - In the Matter of...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online